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Andrew Montour

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Bill Hunt

on Andrew Montour

See link on Bill Hunt presentation at Ashby’s Fort

Other links on Bill Hunt’s presentation of Andrew Montour

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Montour_NCPA

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From this source:

https://journals.psu.edu/phj/article/download/23145/22914

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A FRONTIER DIPLOMAT:

ANDREW MONTOUR By HOWARD LEWIN

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Lewin began this study while he was a graduate student at the Uniyersity of California at Santa Barbara. He completed the writing and revisions while working with the International Voluntary Services in Laos.

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Source of photo below : http://www.ashbysfort.com/montour.html .  Click on photo to enlarge.

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Bill Hunt portrays Andrew Montour, a “metis,” at Fort Ashby Saturday evening, June 30, 2007.

[Andrew Montour’s] physical appearance, nevertheless, was very much that of a European.

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On one of Count Zinzendorf’s’ early sojourns he describes:

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Andrew’s cast of countenance [as] decidedly European, and had not his face been encircled with a broad band of paint, applied with bear’s fat, I would certainly have taken him for one.

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He wore a brown broadcloth coat, a scarlet demasken lappel waistcoat, breeches, over which his shirt hung, a black Cordoven neckerchief, decked with silver bugles, shoes and stockings, and a hat. His ears were hung with pendants of brass and other wires plaited together like the handles of a basket.

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Source: “Nicolaus Ludwig graf von Zinzendorf  (born 26 May 1700 –died  9 May 1760)was a Moravian missionary who traveled extensively through the colonial frontier preaching the Gospel See William C. Reichel, ed., Memorials of the Moravian Church (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1870).

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From this description it seems evident that Andrew Montour inherited the European features of his grandfather and mother, Madame Montour. But it is also evident that he was greatly influenced by his Indian upbringing

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An early source of information concerning the Montour family is found in a letter from Lord Cornbury to the New York Board of Trade, dated August 20, 1708:

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There is come to Albany one Montour, who is the son of a French Gentleman, who came above forty years ago to settle in Canada: he had to do with an Indian woman by whom he had a son and two daughters: The man I mention is the son, he had lived all along like an Indian.4

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Source for quote in orange:

Lord Cornbury  (28 November 1661 – 31 March 1723) to the Board of Trade. August 20, 1708, E. B. O’Calaghan, et al., eds., Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State o e-cw York Procured in Holland, England, and France (Albany, 1853- 18&5), V, 65. Herein cited as the New York Colonial Documents. The man mentioned as the son of “a French Gentleman” was Madame Montour’s brother, and was later killed by order of the French Governor Vaudreuil for aiding the British in diplomatic activities.

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(Lord Cornbury’s cousin is Queen Anne who appointed Lord Cornbury, a cross dresser, Governor of both NY and  NJ.

 

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Tlhe French Gentleman” mentioned was probably the father of Madame Montour.

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In the year 1698 he was wounded by a Mohawk raiding party near Fort La Motte on Lake Champlain. Shortly thereafter one of his daughters, Madame Montour, was captured by an Iroquois tribe, probably Oneidas, and brought Up as an Indian.

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Upon reaching her majority she became the wife of all Oneida war chief, Carondawanna (Big Tree) or Robert Hunter, a name he took to honor the governor of New York.

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Carondadawanna fell in battle against the Catawbas in the spring of 1729. Madame Montour retained her maiden name, as was Iroquois CLstomn, and it is therefore with this name that her reputation as a diplomat is associated.

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Source:

Darlington, Gist, p. 152. See also Charles A. Hanna, The Wilderness 1 I or Ventures and Adventures, of the Pennsvh’ania Traders on the -‘ 1he1y Path, with Some Newo Annals of the Old West, and the Records ° 3on111c Strong Men and Some Bad Ones (New York: Putnam, 1911), I, -9–200. In addition see Reuben Gold Thwaites, ed., Early Western Travels, l–1846 (21 vols.. Cleveland: Arthur H. Clark Co., 1904), 1, 27-28.

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