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Corner of Cork and Braddock

CORK STREET

Compiled and written by Jim Moyer updated as a separate page 2/23/2017

One more thought before you step inside the Washington Office museum.

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The street name Cork.

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Why Cork Street is named Cork Street

Braddock’s 44th and 48th Regiments embarked on the Atlantic Ocean to Virginia from the Cork area of Ireland particularly what was then called Cove of Cork, now called Cobh, Ireland.

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As Quarles points out this Cork Street “was named in 1759 when the Lord Fairfax Addition was laid off and the name assigned before patents were issued” as proof that no way could the name have arisen because Irish lived on the street because the street was named before anyone lived there.

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The memory of Braddock and his army and its fate and where the army came from – Cork, Ireland, is the most powerful reason why the name was picked.

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Quarles looks at another theory:

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That this Cork Street was a street in the West End of London. Quarles states it lacks the power of any personal associations or links to anyone in town, except Quarles points out one nagging juxtaposition:

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The West End London street of Cork Street connects to a Clifford Street. There is also a Clifford Street one block south of Cork Street in Winchester VA.

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How the 2 streets are related Quarles entertains no guess.

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But we do know Cork Ireland was the stationing and drafting point and departure point of Braddock’s troops:

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“…and on the 30th of September [1754] orders were issued for the Forty-fourth and Forty-eighth regiments, both of them on the Irish Establishment, to be embarked at Cork.”
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Source is Page 268 from A HISTORY OF THE BRITISH ARMY BY THE HON. J. W. FORTESCUE PART TO THE CLOSE OF THE SEVEN TEARS 1 WAR VOL. II MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK : THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1899, link : https://archive.org/stream/historyofbritish02fortuoft#page/268/mode/2up

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And Cove of Cork near Cork was the naval launching point. Cobh is pronounced like “Cove”:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobh

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http://www.kronoskaf.com/syw/index.php?title=1755_-_British_expedition_against_Fort_Duquesne

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Still, we propose: Cork Street is not named after that West London Street. Nor is it named for County Cork, but rather the Cork area, in particular Cove of Cork where Braddock’s Troops came from.

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And as Cork intersects with Braddock, a beautiful, fateful symmetry appears.

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And what better place for this Washington Place to situate itself , and thus this Braddock Memorial, the cannon, at the nexus of Cork and Braddock.

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Quarles book, page 61:

Winchester, Virginia, Streets, Churches, and Schools 1s6 Edition by Garland R. Quarles, published by Winchester-Frederick Historical Society, Winchester VA 1996, “Streets” portion originally published 1958.

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Side note: There were very short periods of time when maybe certain blocks of Braddock Street went by the name of Drury Lane in 1778 or Duffield Street before the McGuires took residence on 103 N Braddock states Garland Quarles.

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Oh, One more thing about Cove of Cork

Cove of Cork was not just the last port of call for the Titanic in 1913 but the Lusitania got torpedoed on 7 May 1915 nearby, twenty days before this Braddock Memorial Commemoration Event in Winchester VA.

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26 May 1915 front page Braddock Sash girlsAnd on 26 May 1915, one day before the big event, the Winchester Evening Star reports The Nebraskan was torpedoed in the same area Lusitania was hit when heading towards Cove of Cork, aka Queensland and later called Cobh Ireland.

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To the right of that column is the article about the girls who hold the sash of Braddock whose 2 regiments the 44th and 48th departed from this harbor in January of 1755.

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Orme’s Journal, observes, “In about ten days, all the transports being arrived, orders were given for all the ships to proceed immediately to Alexandria ; but so little care had been taken at Corke, in the stowage of the cloathing, Arms, and camp necessaries belonging to the Regiments of Shirley and Pepperell, that some was put on board almost every ship ; they were removed into one Vessel, and dispatched immediately to New York and Boston, which caused a delay of four or five days.”

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Source: “The history of an expedition against Fort Du Quesne, in 1755; under Major-General Edward Braddock ..” by Sargent, Winthrop, 1825-1870, edtion 1856, page 290.

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