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Apr
15

Braddock’s Defeat 3 Years Later

By
When:
November 26, 2017 all-day
2017-11-26T00:00:00-05:00
2017-11-27T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Braddock
PA 15104
USA

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BRADDOCK’S DEFEAT 3 YEARS LATER

compiled, written by Jim Moyer, updated  4/15/18,  4/29/2108

Click to enlarge. Sketch by Jim Moyer of the dark woods to show the burial detail.

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What did the site of

Braddock’s Defeat

look like

3 years later?

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The sounds of the Battle 3 years ago in 2 pictures:

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F AND I WAR REENACTORS MARYLAND 1 220px-Braddock's_death_at_the_Battle_of_Monongahela_9-July-1755

Braddock’s Defeat occurred July 9, 1755

compiled, written by Jim Moyer   2015, July 2017, 8/29/2017, 4/15/2018

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To Give a Sense of this Story,

let us give you a scene

of the battlefield 3 years later.

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Battle of the Wilderness Virginia 1864. this may have been what it looked in 1758 when the men of Forbes Expedition after celebrating their victory over Fort Duquesne, did the grim hike to their own past 3 years ago.

A word that caught our eye – The skulls.

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The Forbes Expedition follows up on this scene 3 years later.

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The French gave up, leaving a burnt ghost of a fort, November 1758, three years after Braddock’s disaster.

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And now the victors will march to Braddock field.

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It is their first chance after 3 years to see their fallen comrads.

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In Volume 2, Young George Washington, published by Charles Scribner and Sons, 1948,  pages 366-367, Douglas Southall Freeman writes:

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Click on picture to Enlarge. Sketch of woods by Jim Moyer to show the extra large trees in this dark forest. The Virginia Regiment is overlaid on the sketch to show the Virginia Regiment of the Forbes Expedition after having celebrated the capture of Fort Duquesne November 1758, travel to the site of Braddock’s Defeat of 3 years earlier of July 9, 1755 to bury their men still left above ground.

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“…a service of thanksgiving

on the 26th

with a sermon,

a day of celebration

on the 27th,

and then a solemn march

to Braddock’s field,

where the skulls

of more than

450 men were buried.

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Their bones long before had been scattered by wolves.”

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A Hallowed Halloween of a site greeted our Forbes Expedition victors.

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See  wolf behavior.  

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Bottom of graph shows number of kills.  Left side of graph shows percentage of consuming the corpse. Conclusion: Less Kills, higher Consumption.

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More Kills, Less Consumption.

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Source for graph:

http://isleroyalewolf.org/node/42

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Benjamin West sketch.

Fort Ligonier opening day for  first showing this sketch: 4/28/2018:

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See events at Fort Ligonier, known as Loyalhannon or some similar spelling in the letters of the soldiers who camped there.

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It shows a British officer in 1758

reclaiming the remains

of family members

killed on Braddock’s Field

in the Battle of the Monongahela,

an earlier engagement

of the French and Indian War.

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“It depicts the emotional moment

when Major Sir Francis Halkett

identified the bones

of his father and brother,

both killed

under what a witness called

a remarkable tree

over three years before,”

Nuckles said.

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The sketch will be

displayed next to

“The Reunion,”

an historical painting

of the same scene

by modern artist

Robert Griffing

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Click or touch photo to enlarge.

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See article

http://triblive.com/local/westmoreland/13526370-74/fort-ligonier-visitors-can-enjoy-benjamin-west-sketch-when-renovated-art-gallery

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See Francis Halkett’s last letter to Colonel George Washington.

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This letter was written 6 days before the Virginia Regiment hiked to the spot of Braddock’s Defeat.

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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-06-02-0128

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Source of the Son and Father  in Fatal Embrace


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This story was re-created in 1/30th scale by one of my favorite toy soldier manufacturers, John Jenkins of John Jenkins Designs,

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“Among the most distinguished of the dead was Sir Peter Halkett of Pitferran, Colonel of the 44th, and a gallant and sagacious soldier; whose two sons were fighting by his side when he fell. One of these, Lieutenant James Halkett of his own regiment, hastened at the moment to his aid, and with open arms bent to raise the dying form. But pierced by an Indian bullet his body dropped heavily across his leader’s corpse, and father and son lay in death together.”

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Source:

Page 244 of  – The history of an expedition against Fort Du Quesne, in 1755; under Major-General Edward Braddock, Author  Sargent, Winthrop, 1825-1870

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Sources for Francis Halkett

seeing the remains

of his Brother and Father

at Braddock’s Battle Site

3 years later


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Francis Halkett, who survived the battle of Braddock’s Defeat,  – Did he return to this site 3 years later ?  And … did he identify his dead brother and dead father ?

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George Washington is at Fort Loudoun Winchester VA and writes his first letter to Francis Halkett 12 April 1758: 

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Are we to have you once more among us? and shall we revisit, together, a hapless spot, that proved so fatal to so many of our (former) brave companions? 

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es! and I rejoice at it; hoping it will now be in our power to testify a just abhorrence of the cruel Butcheries exercised on our friends, in the unfortunate Day of Genl Braddock’s Defeat;

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and moreover to shew our Enemies, that we can practise all that lenity and compassion of which they only boast, without affording any adequate proofs at all.

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MORE LINKS

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Good article on beginnings of Braddock Expedition

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44th Regiment – Sir Peter Halkett

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48th Regiment – Colonel Thomas Dunbar

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More on Dunbar

The Sole Surviving Colonel – Thomas Dunbar

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Forbes Expedition Conclusions


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Analysis on Grant:

That Forbes depended greatly upon Grant’s good sense is found in a letter to his superior, “and now that Major Grant is gone I have no mortal belonging to my Command that I can either trust with a letter, or argue seriously about Army proceedings, Frank Halkett alone excepted who is most diligent,. . .”66 A week later, from Raystown, Forbes again wrote Abercrombie about Grant, adding the postscript, “I hope in God you will lose no time in endeavouring to get back to Maj. Grant from Montreal, he was my only slight anchor, and support, . . .”67 … Major Grant lived to become a brigadier general and to give a life’s service to Great Britain. He did good work for that country during the Revolution. He was in the battle of Long Island and probably had something to do with arranging the exchange of Colonel Burd’s son who was captured by the British in that engagement.68 If Forbes did not give him the full blame, and his own country honored him, it seems hardly fair that America should remember him only as a rash fellow who exceeded his orders. In view of the fact that Burd had heard those verbal orders given to Grant by Bouquet who later asked Burd to repeat them, and in view of the fact that Burd’s conduct at the battle of Loyal Hanna was doubtless greatly influenced by Grant’s affair, Burd’s account of the instructions to Grant takes on greater interest. Burd wrote William Allen on the 13 th that Grant had marched “to reconnoitre with orders to act agreeable to Circumstances . . .”

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The lack of a real seige:

The lack of climax in the long struggle for the acquisition of this strategic point was sensibly reviewed by Edward Shippen, Jr. The reduction of the fort by driving the French away, though it will not make such an eclat in the world as obtaining it by regular siege or a pitched battle would have done, is nevertheless equally beneficial in its consequences, and General Forbes’ prudence and good conduct will establish his character with thinking people, as effectually as if he had obtained his conquest through blood and slaughter. . .

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Reasons for the Victory:

The French, however, would hardly have evacuated Fort Duquesne, had their Indian allies stood by them. That these aborigines decided to go hunting was largely due to four factors: first, since the base of supplies at Frontenac had been captured, the French could not supply the Indians with the usual gifts; hence the primeval hunt was necessary for sustenance. Second, the slow, relentless progress of Forbes, supported by his fortified line of communication, must have seemed as inevitable as death to the savage, inured only to the short, hasty raid. Third, the character of Christian Frederick Post, embodying the traits of the religion he professed, helped win the red man’s neutrality, for the promises of the Easton treaty seemed valid when delivered by him. Lastly, the severe check received from the provincials under Colonel Burd at Loyal Hanna quenched the ardor of the braves.

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Source of quotes above:

Colonel James Burd in the Forbes Expedition

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More on the Braddock Expedition


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Conestoga Wagons in Braddock’s Campaign, 1755,  Don H. Berkebile, Release Date: August 10, 2009: htttp://www.gutenberg.org/files/29653/29653-h/29653-h.htm

Produced by Chris Curnow, Joseph Cooper, Graeme Mackreth and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net

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Braddock’s Expedition, a monograph, Historical Society of PA

History of an Expedition against Fort Du Quesne in 1755 under Major-General Edward Braddock edited from the original manuscripts by Winthrop Sargeant, M.A., member of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, published Philadelphia, J.B.Lippincott & Co for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania 1856

https://archive.org/stream/historyofexpedit00sarg#page/380/mode/2up

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See Details of the Defeat http://www.britishbattles.com/braddock.htm.

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Click on book for more info

.braddock defeat book BR book

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Letters in the aftermath:

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As Volunteer unpaid aide to General Braddock, George Washington writing from Fort Cumberland 18 July 1755, gives an account of the defeat to Lt Gov Dinwiddie, “As I am favourd with an oppertunity, I shoud think myself inexcusable, was I to omit givg you some acct of our late Engagemt with the French on the Monongahela the 9th Inst. …”

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Read Lt Gov Dinwiddie’s  26 July 1755 letter to Washington, asking if Dunbar might regroup to again march against Fort Du Quesne.  Dunbar instead leaves for Philadelphia.

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They left Fort Cumberland, Will’s Creek, and some came back to it

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Navigate around the Emanuel Episcopal Church at Fort Cumberland using the Google car.

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Navigational Street View of Savage River Camp historical sign  near Fort Cumberland.

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count 40472  on 4/29/2018 1006am Sunday

count 40518 on 4/29/2018 155pm Sunday

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