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BRADDOCK’S SASH

By
When:
July 9, 2015 ‚Äď July 13, 2015 all-day
2015-07-09T00:00:00-04:00
2015-07-14T00:00:00-04:00
Where:
BRADDOCK'S DEFEAT
Braddock
PA
USA

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TRAVELS OF BRADDOCK’S SASH

By Jim Moyer, Sept 2015 through Oct 2015, updates 7/11/2016, 10/15/2016, 7/7/2017

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116 N Braddock Street as of 2015

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You’ll look differently¬†at¬† the now un-assuming 116 N Braddock St in Winchester VA after you read this.

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Provenance

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In History as in Crime, Provenance means a chain of evidence proving some object’s origin.

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peale - 1772 washington portrait 2 editThe object? Braddock’s Sash.

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The Chain of Evidence of this Blood Stained Sash?

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Let’s take a brief look.

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This Sash looks decorative but it’s real designed function?

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It’s a sturdy hammock stretcher.

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It performs as a stretcher to carry General Braddock off the field of Battle, July 9, 1755.

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116 N Braddock Street as of 2015

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Years later on 116 N Braddock Street,¬†in Winchester Virginia, ¬†lives Mary Elizabeth “Bettie” Taylor Bliss Dandridge, not knowing that the Sash lied at the bottom of her Dad’s trunk.

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12691 wfchs

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And this was her house at that site, demolished circa 1947.

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Mary Elizabeth “Bettie” Taylor Bliss Dandridge¬†— quite a name, containing a huge story in each of her names.

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Her Dad?

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President Zachary Taylor.

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He received it from General Gaines, the man who arrested a fugitive Vice President Aaron Burr for trial to be held in Richmond Va and who Gainesville Florida is named after, and possibly our Gainesboro VA.

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BTW, as an aside, Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge’s older but deceased sister?

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She was Jefferson Davis’s first wife, before he became President of the Confederacy.

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But back to 2 reappearances of that Sash in Winchester VA 103 and 101 years ago?

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October 11, 1913 this article appears.

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This was because of a commemoration of Braddock’s Monument in Uniontown PA, attended by the Cold Stream Guard from Great Britain.

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4975 wfchs

These children pose with the Braddock Sash in 1915 in front of the Braddock Cannon at the Washington Office Museum on Cork and Braddock streets, Winchester VA.

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And  on May 27, 1915 at the commemoration of the Braddock Cannon at Cork and Braddock Street, these children of the top families in Winchester hold the Braddock Sash, made in 1709.

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Now that Sash?  Where Now?

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It lands back at Mt Vernon.

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How?

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Because of¬†Prince Yoshihisa Tokugawa related to last Shogun family of Japan, who was¬†a representative in Japan’s Red Cross delegation visiting Mt Vernon¬† 18 July 1918.

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Want more? There’s a lot here.

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Sometimes a full plate kills your hunger.  So take your time.

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Mom says to chew your food.

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Take in a piece here and there  . . . to digest.

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THE DETAILS


By Jim Moyer, Sept 2015 through Oct 2015, updates 7/11/2016, 10/15/2016

THIS PAGE UNDER CONSTRUCTION, RESEARCH ONGOING

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Our research owes a great deal to http://boston1775.blogspot.com.  Using this as a starting point to collect even more data, we appreciate the work of that author.

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Click on this link for info about portrait itself.

Click on this link about the 1709 sash recreation.

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Click on picture to enlarge.

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peale - 1772 washington portrait 2 editBraddock BattleSashSprang1709

BRADDOCK’S SASH

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The sash in the portrait of Washington above is most likely not Braddock’s Sash.¬† This could be the sash Washington ordered in 1754.¬† But it could not ¬†be the sash Washington ordered in 1774 because the portrait was painted in 1772.¬†¬†Washington would most likely not wear¬†the Braddock sash which had blood on it still.

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This portrait was painted in May-April 1772 , the first and earliest known picture of  George Washington.

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The picture to the right of the sash is a recreation of the Braddock Sash.. Notice 1709 at its top.  Sometimes the sash was instead worn about the waist.

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That sash is as strong as a hammock, designed to carry the wounded officer to safety.  A test was performed on sashweaver.com to confirm that utility.  Mt. Vernon holds the Braddock Sash.

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That¬†Sash of¬†our story, carried away a¬†mortally wounded¬†man — 60 year old Major General Edward Braddock¬† — from the surrounding bloody horror, a locality caught¬†in the¬†covetous eye of commerce (The Ohio Company)¬†¬†and two world powers.

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And this blood stained Sash? It¬†allegedly wound its way from the battlefield along the Monongahela to Fort Cumberland MD¬†to Winchester VA to Mt Vernon to New Orleans to Baton Rouge to a trunk for decades in Winchester VA¬† and then¬†back to Mt Vernon through the largesse of a Japanese Shogun in 1918 —– ¬†is it the same one as indicated in the provenance?

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Provenance: record of ownership of a work of art or an antique, used as a guide to authenticity or quality.

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See the chronology of owners.

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Edward Braddock

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From Blog : http://boston1775.blogspot.com/2013/06/tying-up-twisted-history-of-braddock.html

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¬†Weaver Carol James reports that the date ‚Äú1709‚ÄĚ is woven into the sash and suggests that Braddock‚Äôs father graduated from military school in that year. In fact, the elder Braddock was already in the Coldstream Guards as a lieutenant colonel (with the brevet rank of major general, just to confuse things). Instead, 1709 was one year before the younger Braddock joined the Coldstream Guards himself as a fifteen-year-old ensign. Thus, the sash might have been a sort of graduation gift for young Edward as he was about to embark on his own military career .

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THE HANDOFF

of the Sash from Braddock to Washington occurs AFTER this scene.

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EmanuelLeutze Braddock Defeat

Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze (May 24, 1816 ‚Äď July 18, 1868) was a German American history painter best known for his painting Washington Crossing the Delaware. 2 years later he painted Braddock’s military loss in 1858. The painting still hangs in the Braddock Carnegie Library. School children helped raise money in 1911 for its purchase. Source …. http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/Op-Ed/2015/11/15/The-Next-Page-Braddock-s-defeat-revisited/stories/201511220003

A painting by Emanuel Leutze.   See article on this painting.

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Seeing the turmoil in that battle, would the safekeeping of the Sash survive?  Would Washington place the Sash safely with himself on his horse or supply wagon?

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Braddock is said to have told Washington to take his Sash.  Two incentives for Washington to make sure he did not lose this Sash in all the turmoil:

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1. Honored by such a gift from a dying General, Washington would have incentive to keep it and make sure he did not lose it.

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2. This dying General was Washington’s ticket to obtaining a Commissioned paid rank. Maybe this Sash would be still of some bearing.¬†¬†See letter about what Washington thought what promise ¬†Braddock had for him, 14 May 1755:

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The Genl has appointed me one of his aid de Camp,¬† in which Character I shall serve this Campaigne, agreeably enough, as I am thereby freed from all command, but his, and give , ,his,¬† Order‚Äôs to all, which must be implicitly obey‚Äôd. I have now a good oppertunity, and shall not neglect it, of forming an acquaintance which may be serviceable hereafter, if I , ,shall,¬† find it worth while push, to my Fortune in the Military…

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And yet another letter dated the same day¬†not sent but where Washington contemplates, “…as I conceive a little experience will be my chief reward…”

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By the way, Washington was sick from dysentery so bad that he rode with a pillow on his saddle.¬† Did he lose his pillow after having “had 4 Bullets through my Coat, and two Horses shot under…” ?

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The Sash would have been¬†safe¬†from loss or¬†used as a stretcher to carry Braddock even in the mayhem¬†described here:¬† Washington’s Expeditions (1753-1754) and Braddock’s Expedition (1755) With history of Tom Fausett, the slayer of General Edward Braddock, by James Hadden, Uniontown PA, published 1910 , PAGE 112.

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Was Braddock taken off  the sash July 13, 1755 when he died?  Or was Braddock taken off the sash after traveling some distance from the battle site before he died?

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Reasonable conjecture?

 Once Braddock was taken off The Sash and buried,

Washington packed the sash on his horse going home.

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But another article gives credit to Captain Robert Stewart.

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“In 1755, he ¬†was appointed Captain Comandant of a troop of light horse, which he also raised, at a very heavy expense, with unusual despatch.”

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“At the battle of Monongahela, Lieutenant Colonel Stewart had the honour to remount General Braddock four times; and after the General had received a mortal wound, and the debris of the army had retreated, he had the good fortune, assisted only by four private men of his own troop, under a heavy fire, to carry His Majesty’s Command in Chief off the field of battle; and thereby, rescuing his person, from the barbarous insults of a cruel and savage enemy. “

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The source and  title of this piece:

‚ÄúThe case of Lieutenant Colonel Robert Stewart : a captain in a regiment, raised by the King‚Äôs orders, in Virginia.‚ÄĚ

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http://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/uva-lib:2144918

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Side note on the confusion about Robert Stewart’s rank is supplied in¬†this link.

 

 

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George Washington

Did Washington hold on to this sash until death or did he bequeath it to anyone before he died?

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We are still researching that.

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But moving past that, who did GW hand it off to?  Martha, his wife? Or Fielding Lewis Jr?

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Katherine Glass Greene’s ¬†1926 local history Winchester, Virginia, and Its Beginnings, 1743-1814:

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Mary Glass Greene quotes   Mary Spottiswoode Buchanan  who states:

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George Washington gave the sash to his nephew Fielding Lewis 1751-1803 (son of Fielding Lewis , 1725-1781) whose daughter married Colonel E. G.W. Butler of Louisiana  

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and Butler asked Edmund Pendleton Gaines (March 20, 1777 ‚Äď June 6, 1849) to send it out to General Zachary¬†Taylor after his early victories in the Mexican-American War.

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Martha Dandridge Custis Washington

June 13¬†[O.S. June 2]¬†1731‚Äď May 22, 1802)

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Did Martha Washington get The Sash?¬† Or did it go straight to Martha’s granddaughter, Eleanor Parke Custis (1779-1852) and her husband Lawrence Lewis (1737-1839), brother of Fielding Lewis¬†II¬†— both sons of the elder Fielding Lewis?

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If President Washington kept The Sash until his death in 1799, so it might have gone straight to Martha’s granddaughter.

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Owners between Washington and Taylor

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Below section is from blog: http://boston1775.blogspot.com/2013/06/tying-up-twisted-history-of-braddock.html

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Washington‚Äôs step-granddaughter, which¬†was Martha Washington’s granddaughter – Eleanor Parke Custis (1779-1852),

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who married his nephew Lawrence Lewis (1737-1839), brother of Fielding Lewis II.  See letters between GW and Fielding Lewis.

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Lawrence Lewis has close ties to Washington.

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Per Wikipedia link: Lawrence Lewis was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia in 1767 to Fielding Lewis and Betty Washington Lewis, the sister of George Washington. He volunteered for service in 1794 to help suppress the Whiskey Rebellion and served as aide-de-camp to General Daniel Morgan, achieving the rank of major. Washington, after finishing his tenure as president, called on several of his nephews to assist him at his Mount Vernon plantation. On August 4, 1797, he wrote to Lewis inviting him to serve as his personal secretary

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But, Lawrence Lewis dies in 1839 and his wife, Nelly, Eleanor Parke Custis (1779-1852),  lives until 1852.

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So it most likely stays with the wife.

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Would Nelly, the wife, have kept it until her death IN 1852?

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Or would she have had occasion to give the sash to her daughter before the Mexican American War in 1846?

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Their daughter is named Frances Parke Lewis (1799-1875).    Findagrave link.

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She married Edward G. W. Butler (1800-1888)  who as a child was a ward of Andrew Jackson.   Findagrave Link.

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Various stories claim General Edmund Pendleton Gaines handed The Sash to General Zachary Taylor, but it is more likely it was Edward  G. W. Butler, an aide (see (P.D.F. file), to General Gaines.

 

  • Butler’s wife was a direct descendant of Martha Washington, thus a plausible owner of a garment from Mount Vernon.

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  • Butler’s wife‚Äôs father was one of Gen. Washington‚Äôs Lewis nephews.

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  • E. G.W.Butler was ‚ÄúColonel Butler of Louisiana,‚ÄĚ as Mary Spottiswoode Buchanan said.¬† And Mary Spottiswoode Buchanan lived with Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge who¬†found the sash in a trunk after getting a tip from her friend Dr Daniel B Conrad¬†to look for it in her house¬†on 116 N Braddock St in Winchester VA and¬† Mary Spottiswood Buchanan continued to live there after Bettie died.

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  • Butler was ‚Äúa gentleman at New Orleans,‚ÄĚ as De Hass¬† in his 1851 US History book understood, page 129-130.

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  • Butler had a close connection to Gen. Gaines.

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“So I suspect the Butlers, pleased with the early American success against Mexico, decided to pass on a precious family relic to a new hero of the American army.¬†¬† One mystery that the different sources raise is whether the Butlers wanted their relic to go to Taylor himself or to a soldier whom that general deemed particularly worthy. Some of the stories hint at the latter. But Taylor thought the gift was meant for him, and it might have been too awwwkward to tell him otherwise.” – according to Boston1775blogspot.com.

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1804 digging up the grave

In 1804, human remains believed to be Braddock’s were found buried in the roadway about 1.5 miles (2.4¬†km) west of Great Meadows by a crew of road workers. The remains were exhumed.

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This story not vetted here tells of the 1804¬† digging up of the grave: Page 117 of¬† ¬†Washington’s Expeditions (1753-1754) and Braddock’s Expedition (1755) With history of Tom Fausett, the slayer of General Edward Braddock, by James Hadden, Uniontown PA, published 1910.

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A marble monument was erected over the new grave site in 1913 by the Coldstream Guards.

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Can we compare any sample of the grave and match any residue on the Sash?

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Zachary Taylor

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General Zachary Taylor left¬†many of¬†his belongings at the¬†“Fashion Plantation” of his son, Richard “Dick” Taylor.

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Did that trunk holding Braddock’s Sash¬†move to the White House?

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Or did it stay with his son at the “Fashion Plantation” which was plundered and¬†burned down?

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And if it stayed with the son, was the trunk¬†moved by¬†the widow Margaret “Peggy” Taylor¬† who went to the plantation to complete decisions on the estate before it was plundered and¬†burned down in the War Between The States?

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According to Mary Spottiswood Buchanan who lived with Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge (daughter of President Zachary Taylor) that the trunk in which they found the sash was sitting with Bettie for years even before¬†The War Between The States.¬† Bettie must’ve had that trunk even before moving into 116 N Braddock St in Winchester VA.¬† Deed books show she and her husband owned that property. Prior to that they rented.

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“Richard Taylor had purchased “Fashion” in 1851.¬† His mother, the President’s widow, “came to Fashion Plantation to live with my Father of course bringing with her her husband’s papers, belongings-trophies of the Mexican War etc.,” Richard Taylor’s daughter wrote many years later.” – see PDF of index of Zachary Taylor’s papers.

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“I think I will send home the private papers by mail, if I do not let any one have them. The camp is loaded down withplunder-all kinds of clothing, rings, watches, guns, pistols, swords, and some of General Taylor’s old hats and coats, belt swords-and, in fact, every old relic he had is worn about the camp.”¬†¬† from A¬†Vermont Yankee who saw the plunder, quoted in ¬†PDF of index of Zachary Taylor’s papers.

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MARGARET TAYLOR, WIFE

MARGARET “PEGGY” MACKALL SMITH TAYLOR

(21 September, 1788  to 14 August, 1852)

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We have found no evidence the wife knew of Braddock’s Sash.¬† But we track her movements to ask if at anytime she might have moved unwittingly the trunk holding Braddock’s Sash.

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From firstladies.org link:

Peggy Taylor left the White House with her daughter AnnWood and her family, and lived with them for three months in Baltimore, more composed than she had been in her husband’s final days. She then proceeded with her two daughters to New Orleans, where they met up with her son Dick for the legal division of Taylor’s estate.

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She initially returned to live with the Blisses in Kentucky but found the constant expressions of sympathy for the late president that her presence always provoked to be too oppressive.

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She then moved to live with her son Dick In 1849 he had begun an extensive sugar plantation operation in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana and she may have joined him for his inspection trips there on occasion.

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All of the Taylor family’s personal correspondence was stored at her last home which was burned by Union troops during the Civil War.

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During a visit to her daughter Betty, who had by then relocated to  East Pascagoula, Mississippi, the former First Lady died suddenly.

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BETTIE DANDRIDGE

Mary Elizabeth “Betty” Taylor Bliss Dandridge, born Mary Elizabeth Taylor (April 20, 1824 ‚Äď July 25, 1909). Youngest daughter of President Zachary Taylor.¬†¬† Buried in Winchester VA.

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Bettie Dandridge allegedly had Braddock’s Sash for decades in the bottom of a trunk and didn’t know it.

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Background on Bettie

Betty or Bettie?¬† Contemporary accounts of that time¬†use “Bettie” ¬†more often.¬†Modern accounts use “Betty.”¬† Example of the “Bettie” spelling is in this book published one year after¬†Bettie’s death: Washington’s Expeditions (1753-1754) and Braddock’s Expedition (1755) With history of Tom Fausett, the slayer of General Edward Braddock, by James Hadden, Uniontown PA, published 1910 , PAGE 112

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Bettie was 11 years old when her older sister, Sarah¬†Knox “Knoxie” Taylor Davis,¬†married¬†Jefferson Davis in 1835¬† and then her sister¬†died that year, long before Jefferson Davis became President of the¬†Confederate States of America¬†.¬†¬† See Sarah’s find a grave link.

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In Baton Rouge,¬† 5 December 1848, Bettie married William Wallace Smith Bliss, an army officer and mathematician¬†who knew 13 different languages and who¬†had served with her father, General Zachary Taylor. Her father was elected President the month before in November¬† and who then appointed his daughter’s husband as his presidential secretary.

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President Taylor’s wife promised she would retire from public life if her husband survived the war.¬† So her daughter, Bettie, known as Mrs Bliss at the time, took up the role as First Lady¬†of all White House functions.

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The Betty Polka was written for her.   See first ladies link  for more on that.

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July 9, 1850,¬†Bettie’s father, President Zachary Taylor died.

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Bettie and her husband lived at  Pascagoula, Mississippi, where Mrs. Taylor lived with another married daughter until her death two years later. The following year, William Bliss died of yellow fever contracted in New Orleans.[2] Mrs. Bliss was a widow at the age of 29.

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February 11, 1858, Bettie married again, to Philip Pendleton Dandridge in Winchester VA.  Husband buried in Winchester VA, Oct. 28,  1881.

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BETTIE HELPS A CONFEDERATE PRISONER

12 January 1865 Friday. Bettie helps a prisoner.

Saved a Confederate prisoner’s life from hanging by Union General Sheridan.¬† That condemned prisoner she saved? Later became her pall bearer at her funeral in 1909.¬† According to the Winchester Evening Star, Monday 26 July 1909, “One of her pall bearers Wednesday will be Mr. John E. Boyd, of Martinsburg, who owes his life to her. … Sheridan and his troops were encamped in Winchester¬† when Mr. Boyd left the Confederate lines and started to visit his home. His presence here on the way to Berkeley county was betrayed by servants and he was captured and sentenced to be hung as a spy. He was thrown into prison on Piccadilly street, and the scaffold was built. Even his coffin was ready, it having been made in …”¬† Cannot finish quote. The copy of this article fades.¬† This copy is in a folder that Handley Library Archives. Will research on microfiche.

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12pm 13 January 1865 Col John E Boyd was to be executed.  Bettie along with others interceded.  He was her cousin.  Almost 10 months later Bettie buys house on 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA.

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WHERE IS BETTIE LIVING?

At some point Bettie is living on 217 West Boscawen Street Winchester VA. According to research by Ben Ritter in a file at Handley Library Archives, he believes this is Bettie’s residence because the artist James E Taylor got his information from a Joseph Denny “who knew where everyone lived.”¬† The 1860 census¬† lists no Dandridge¬†on any property, per Ben Ritter, Handley Library Archives.

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116 N BRADDOCK ST WINCHESTER VA PURCHASED

116 N Braddock Street Winchester VA purchased:

On 4 October 1865, (Lee surrendered to Grant 9 April 1865), Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge buys the house in Winchester Va on 116 N. Braddock Street, since taken down in 1947.¬† Purchase is shown in Winchester Deed Book 11, page 216 per Ben Ritter’s notes in Handley Library Archives.¬† From a copy in Handley Library Archives, a Winchester Evening Star, on a Friday April (rest of date cut off – presumably 1947) , states Bettie bought the house from a Mr Gold, that the house was built in 1812.

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It is interesting to note that William Greenway Russell does not mention Bettie Dandridge’s home in his book, “What I Know About Winchester,” and nor does Quarles in his corrective footnotes to that book.¬† But the Deed Book 11, page 216 does confirm the purchase.

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CONGRESSIONAL ASSISTANCE:

3 March 1880, Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge, and Sarah Knox Wood¬† applies for assistance from the US Congress, and is granted some assistance 16¬†June 1880.¬†¬† Sarah had lived with her older sister,¬† Blandina Dudley “Nina” Wood Boyce Von Grabow¬†in Germany for years.¬† Her older sister died 7 September 1892 in Berlin.¬† Also¬†Bettie’s 2nd husband died Oct. 28,¬† 1881.¬† So sister Sarah joined Bettie at 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA at some point.

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It is interesting that this application for assistance from the Congress was made before Bettie’s husband died, and while Sarah was probably still living in Germany with her older sister Blandina Dudley “Nina” Wood Boyce von Grabow.

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WHO IS LIVING WITH BETTIE?

Sara Knox Wood joined Bettie¬†at least¬†after her older sister died in 1892. According to this source published in 1909,¬†Sarah has lived, “..and for the past ten years has been a resident of Winchester VA.”¬† And Mary Spottiswoode Buchanan at some point¬†lives with Bettie on 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA.¬† The Winchester Evening Star, 19 September 1925, states Mary Spottiswood Buchanan, “For many years made her home with her aunt, the late Mrs. Betty Dandridge at the Braddock street address.”¬†¬†

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28 October 1881, Bettie’s husband dies. ¬†Husband buried in Winchester VA, Oct. 28,¬† 1881.

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WHEN WAS THE SASH FOUND?

Dr Daniel B Conrad read a book. We don’t know when he read it. The book was published in 1851. This book stated who had the sash. ¬†This prompted Dr Daniel B Conrad to ask Bettie if she had it. According to this article, she didn’t know of it and looked for it but didn’t find it until later. The sash was discovered at the bottom of a trunk that had been sitting around for 25 years.¬† When did Dr Daniel B Conrad ask Bettie? When did she find it?

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To narrow down when Dr Daniel B Conrad asked Bettie about The Sash, we can probably rule out the war years.¬† Dr Daniel B Conrad’s diaries¬† of 1855-1864 show his extensive travels and war exploits.¬†So our¬†conjecture as to when he mentioned to Bettie she might have The Sash? Probably after¬†marrying in 1871¬†or after¬†1879 when he settled in the Seeley House on Boscawen Street Winchester VA.¬† Or maybe after he settled down after creating the insane asylum and running it and then retiring back to his house in Winchester VA.

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One of the articles says the Sash was sitting in a trunk for 25 years. If we add 25 to 1865 (the year Bettie moved into 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA) we get 1890.

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Found The Sash and refused offer of 3000 dollars from the Coldstream Guards.

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25 July 1909 Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge dies,

leaving Sara Knox Wood and Mary Spottiswoode Buchanan living at 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA.¬† According to Winchester Evening Star, Friday April ??, 1947?, “Mrs. Dandridge devised the home her niece or great niee Miss Mary Spottswood Buchanan, who resided in it until her death, a few years ago.”¬† This is a copy of an article in a folder with Handley Library Archives¬†where the date was cut off.¬† The article misspelled Spottswood. Should be Spottiswoode.¬†¬†Sarah Knox Wood is also living there at least after 1892 according to this source.

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1909, Sarah Knox Wood who lived with Bettie, gives to Maryland Historical Society temporarily The Sash to display.   GETT ATTRIBUTION

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1909. As an aside, Winchester City Council purchases the property on Cork St and Braddock, now known as Washington’s Headquarters.

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15 October 1913 unveiling of monument in Uniontown PA for General Braddock who had been a Colonel of the Coldstream Guards.   See two newspaper articles on this.  The Gazette Times 12 October 1913 newspaper in Pittsburgh PA   and    The Gazette Times 12 October 1913 newspaper in Pittsburgh PA .  5000 people is the estimated crowd.  See pictures further down in this blog.

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28 February 1915 Sarah Knox Wood dies,

leaving only Mary Spottiswood Buchanan still living in 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA.

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27 May 1915. The General Braddock Memorial Parade. Huge event culminating at Washington’s Headquarters to commemorate the unveiling of the General Braddock Memorial, which is the canon sitting on a rock and cement foundation with two memorial tablets and 10 of its rocks originating from historical and significant places in the Shenandoah Valley. The Braddock Sash is photographed at this event.

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19 September 1925, 1pm, Mary Spottiswoode Buchanan dies.

According to the Winchester Evening Star of same date, Mary¬†Spottiswoode Buchanan¬†lived with Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge¬†“for many years.”

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The Trunk

Bettie Dandridge  lived on Braddock Street in Winchester VA. Her friend  Dr Daniel B Conrad read  a US History book claiming  that Gen Zachary Taylor had it.   Dandridge said she didn’t know but then found it at bottom of a trunk sitting for decades.

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This is the book Dr Conrad probably read:

See Pages 129-130 of  The History of the Early Settlement and Indian Wars of Western Virginia by Wills De Hass, published in 1851.

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Who was this Dr Daniel B Conrad mentioned in the newspaper article?  Do we have the right Conrad? The Holmes and Conrad families in Winchester VA are related, a Holmes Conrad being well known in town.

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The following link asks, “The item doesn‚Äôt state what or who had prompted Dandridge to look for the sash among her father‚Äôs possessions. One possibility is an inquiry from that London military institution‚ÄĒwhy else would she have named it as a possible recipient?”¬† ¬†http://boston1775.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-missing-sash-of-gen-braddock.html

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This is answered by news article October 12 1913 The Pittsburgh Gazette Times, Page 36. Excerpt of this article:

“A strong friendship existed between Dr. Conrad and Mrs. Dandridge, who was General Taylor’s daughter, and he told her that she must have Gen. Braddock’s sash somewhere in her possession.¬† Mrs. Dandridge, however had no recollection of the the sash, and a search of her belongings, failed to reveal it. Then an old trunk, which had not been opened for 25 years, was unpacked, and there at the bottom was a piece of silk labeled “Gen. Braddock’s sash.”¬† Mrs Dandridge … not long before her death … at her home on Braddock Street in this city (Winchester VA), she disposed of the relice to William Boyce, of Washington, and at his death it came into possession of Miss Wood.”

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So, the sash sat in a trunk for 25 years?¬† When did Bettie make that claim¬†?¬† We could narrow that down to¬†between Bettie’s death in 1909 and the 1851 publishing date of that history book Dr Daniel B Conrad read.

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Did that trunk holding Braddock’s Sash sit in the White House when¬† Zachary Taylor was President?¬† Or was it sitting in New Orleans at his son, Richard (Dick) Taylor’s Plantation¬†when ¬†the widow Margaret “Peggy” Taylor went to resolve estate questions?

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Or after the White House in 1850 when her father, President Taylor died, did it follow Bettie Dandridge?  Then in 1858 did the trunk come with Bettie Dandridge to Winchester VA when she married a Winchester man?

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If the trunk came with Bettie Dandridge to  her house on 116 N Braddock Street, then that trunk would have sat in her house from October 1865 (when she purchased the house)  to July 1909 (when she died) at the most. In that timespan Bettie discovered the Sash after Dr. Robert Y. Conrad, her friend, mentions that she probably has it.   When did he mention this to her?

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Click on pictures of Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge’s house, 116 N Braddock St, to enlarge.

116 N Braddock Street as of 2015
It sat where the unmarked FBI quarters are on 112 and 116 N Braddock Street.  The house Bettie lived in was demolished circa 1947.  See what this location looks like now. Click on this link to navigate Google car along the street.

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1717-23 wfchs 12691 wfchs 69619 wfchs 69622 wfchs

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Oct. 28,  1881 her husband died.  Sometime after that The Cold Stream Guards make an offer of 3000 which Dandridge refused.

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 1894 a report appeared in the Winchester (Virginia) News, picked up in the 31 May 1894  Baltimore Sun .

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Other newspaper articles later :  September 1894 issue of The United Service: A Monthly Review of Military and Naval Affairs. Curiously, a year and a half later the 20 Oct 1895 Knoxville Journal.

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Sarah Knox Wood

Birth: Nov 21, 1839 Prairie du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin,
Death:  Feb 28, 1915 in Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia

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Four years after  Sarah Knox Taylor Davis marries Jefferson Davis and dies in 1835, this new Sarah is born.

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The first¬†Sarah is¬†Bettie Taylor Bliss Dandridge’s sister.

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This 2nd Sarah is a granddaughter of Zachary Taylor and his wife.

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This 2nd Sarah is living with Bettie Dandridge at 116 N Braddock St Winchester VA

Sarah Knox Wood (1839-1915) named for Davis’ first wife, was born in Florida, the youngest child of Ann Taylor Wood and Dr Robert C Wood, an army surgeon. Davis was her godfather. She never married, living with her sister and family in Germany for 30 years and after her sister’s death (1892) with her widowed aunt Bettie Taylor Dandridge in Winchester VA (Burke’s Presidential Families, 244; Winchester Evening Star, March 1, 1915; Hamilton, Taylor 2:27, 171; Taylor, Letters, xi; Davis Papers 1:476, 6: 250).

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In 1909, Miss Sarah Knox Wood, a descendent of President Taylor’s, allowed the Maryland Historical Society to exhibit the sash, which was then in her keeping (Maryland Historical Magazine, 5 [1910], pp. 73-74). It is now on display at Mount Vernon (Elswyth Thane, Mount Vernon: The Legacy, p. 92).¬† page 140 Apendix A of Braddock at the MonongahelaBy Paul Kopperman.

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By Mr. Jonas: A bill (S. 1417) A bill for the relief of Mrs Bettie Taylor Dandridge, and Miss Sarah Knox Wood, daughter and granddaughter of Zachary Taylor, late President of the United States ; to the Committee on Appropriations was introduced March 3, 1880.

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June 16, 1880, 46th Congress: That the Secretary of the Treasury pay, out of any money in the Treasure not otherwise appropriated, to Mrs Bettie Taylor Dandridge and Miss Sarah Knox Wood, daughter and granddaughter of General Zachary Taylor, late President of the United States, the sum of 25 thousand dollars: Provided always, That any sum of money which shall have been paid to President Taylor or to the personal representatives of the said Zachary Taylor since his death, on account of his salary as President of the United States for the year from March 4, 1850 to 4, 1851, shall be deducted from the said sum of 25000 dollars.

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Sarah Knox Wood family origins

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Mr. and Mrs. Zachary Taylor had six children, Ann Mackall, Sarah Knox, Agnes, Margaret, Mary Elizabeth, and Richard, of whom two, Agnes and Margaret, died in early childhood.

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Ann Mackall was born April 9, 1811, near Louisville, Ky., and was married about 1829, at Fort Crawford, now Prairie du Chien, Wis., on the upper Mississippi river, where her father was stationed, to Dr. Robert Crooke Wood, a surgeon in the army, to whom most of the remarkable letters in this volume were addressed.

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Immediately after her marriage she went with her husband to Fort  Snelling, further up the Mississippi. This fort was founded in 1820 at the junction of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers and is the oldest settlement in Minnesota. She died in Germany in December, 1875. Dr. Wood was born in Newport, R. L, about 1800, entered the army May 25, 1825, as an assistant surgeon, became major surgeon July 4, 1836, was assistant surgeon-general with the rank of colonel, and on March 13, 1865, received the brevet of brigadier-general for gallant and meritorious service during the Civil war. After a long, useful, and honorable career he died in New York city, March 28, 1869.

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Dr. Wood had four children, to whom many references are made in these letters, John Taylor Wood, Robert Crooke Wood, Blandina Dudley Wood, and Sarah Knox Wood.

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The fourth child, Sarah Knox Wood, was born at Tampa Bay, Florida. For many years she lived with her sister in Germany, and for the past ten years has been a resident of Winchester, Va.

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WILLIAM BOYCE

(19 Nov 1859 – 22 Jan 1907)

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William Boyce of Washington (DC? Or Washington State? Or Washington Street in Winchester? Since Betty Dandridge lived in Braddock St Winchester VA)

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upon William Boyce’s death Miss Sarah Wood.

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Monument Ceremony in 1913

Attending October 11 1913, from Winchester is Mary Spotswood Buchanan, a relative of Bettie Dandridge at event of Coldstream Guards of England at unveiling of monument in Uniontown PA for General Braddock who had been a Colonel of the Coldstream Guards.¬† Sash is 10 feet long, dark read silk.¬† Braddock‚Äôs sash owned by Winchester woman ‚Äď newspaper.¬† October 12 1913 The Pittsburgh Gazette Times, Page 36

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there’s another article from this Pittsburgh gazette

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Braddock Ceremony

Click on picture to enlarge. From 16 October 1913 issue of The Gazette Times from Pittsburgh.

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Braddock Ceremony 2

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Click on picture to enlarge. From 16 October 1913 issue of The Gazette Times from Pittsburgh.

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Greene‚Äôs book also describes how a ‚ÄúGeneral Codrington‚ÄĚ reacted to seeing the sash when he attended a ceremony dedicating a monument to Braddock. The 16 Oct 1913 Gazette Times of Pittsburgh confirms that Lt. Gen. Sir Alfred E. Codrington led the British delegation at that dedication ceremony. http://boston1775.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-braddock-sash-on-display.html

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5000 is size of crowd.  Mentions Lt General Sir Alfred E Codrington

get pictures

16 October 2015 The Gazette Times, first page and 2nd page coverage

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The Shogun in 1918?

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Annual reports ( 1917-2008) ¬†– The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union

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Prince Yoshihisa Tokugawa, representing the Red Cross of Japan,¬† visited Mount Vernon as a guest of the Nation last July, and was so¬†impressed with sentiments of admiration and with reverence for the¬† memory of General Washington that he made to the Mount Vernon¬† Ladies’ Association a personal donation of the sum of one thousand¬† dollars “to be used for the purpose of purchasing some relic of General¬† Washington which it would be appropriate to place in General Washin¬† ton’s home.” Prince Tokugawa also expressed the wish that his name¬† might be associated with the relic, as this act on his part is but an expres sion of sentiment. The grateful acknowledgment with thanks from the¬† Regent and Vice-Regents of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the¬† Union for Prince Tokugawa’s valued gift reached His Excellency before he sailed for France.

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Annual Report (1919) Mount Vernon Ladies Association, Page 9

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July 18, 1918‚ÄĒPrince Tokugawa and suite, representing the Japan¬† Red Cross.

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Annual Report (1919) Mount Vernon Ladies Association, Page 32

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Mrs. Washington’s gold watch, which had been sold by Mr. George¬†L. Upshur for the benefit of the Red Cross fund, was turned over to the¬†Mount Vernon collection of relics (last June) by Mr. George J. Whelan,¬†of New York, the gentleman who purchased it for that patriotic purpose.¬† I placed it in the Banquet Hall relic case, with descriptive card worded¬†in accordance with Mr. Upshur’s wish.¬† His Excellency, Prince Tokugawa, representing the Red Cross of¬†Japan, when on his visit here last July, saw the watch, learned its history¬†and how it had helped the Red Cross cause. He then graciously contributed $1,000 for the purchase of some George Washington relic to be¬†added to our collection. His gift was accepted by the Regent.

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Annual Report (1919) Mount Vernon Ladies Association, Page 39

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Interesting history of handoffs of The Sash here:

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Prince Yoshihisa Takugawa’s gift to Mount Vernon in 1919, “to be¬† used for the purpose of purchasing some Washington relic appropriate to¬† be placed in Washington’s home,” has enabled the Association to have¬† returned to Mount Vernon the sash worn by General Braddock at the¬† time of his defeat, and upon which he was borne mortally wounded from¬† the field of battle by his aide, Colonel George Washington, and two¬†soldiers. General Braddock gave the sash to Colonel Washington who¬†brought it to Mount Vernon in 1755; here it was kept until after his¬†death, when it passed into the possession of his nephew who married¬†“Nelly” Custis. In 1846 Colonel Butler, of Louisiana, who married their¬†daughter, presented the sash to General Zachary Taylor after his victories¬† on the Rio Grande, and, while General Taylor was President of the United¬†States, the sash was in the White House. His daughter, Mrs. Bliss,¬† brought it to Virginia after President Taylor’s death, and last summer it¬† was purchased from one who had inherited it.¬† The request made by the Japanese Prince, that “his name might be¬† associated with the relic, as this act on his part is but an expression of¬† sentiment,” should be complied with.

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Annual Report (1920) Mount Vernon Ladies Association, page 9

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Purchased with funds donated by Prince Yoshihisa Tokugawa, 1918

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Mrs. Washington’s great-greatniece, Miss Mary Spottiswood Buchanan of Winchester, Va., presents a bedspread which is a family heir loom and hopes it can be used on Mrs. Washington’s bed. Miss Buchanan¬† assures us she can and will secure for Mount Vernon the “Camp Bed”¬† used by General Washington during the Revolution.

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Through Miss  Buchanan has secured the famous Braddock Sash and its story was heard  with the greatest interest when introduced into Mount Vernon talks.

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This¬† Sash was used as a stretcher to bear General Braddock’s body from the¬† field of battle when he fell, mortally wounded‚ÄĒthere are seven blood¬† stains visible.

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Before his death General Braddock gave this Sash to his¬† only surviving aide, Col. George Washington.¬† Through Nelly Custis Lewis it descended to Col. E. George Washington Bittern of New Orleans, who gave it to General Zachary Taylor,¬† whom he considered the hero of the Mexican War. At his death it was¬† found in his war chest by his daughter, Mrs. Phillip Doudridge [note:¬†Dandridge is the correct name]¬†of Winchester, Va., who as Mrs. Bliss presided at the White House during the¬† Taylor Administration.¬† In 1883 the London papers advertised for information concerning¬† this Sash. Having located it, the Prince of Wales sent two officers of¬† Braddock’s old command, the 84th Essex Regiment of the “Cold Stream¬† Guards,” with the request that they be allowed to purchase it, offering¬† $3,000, which Mrs. Doudridge [note: Dandridge is the correct name] refused.¬† When the Braddock Monument was unveiled sixteen Englishmen¬† were sent to represent the Government. They invited Miss Buchanan to¬† come as their guest and bring the famous Sash. During the ceremonies¬† she presented it to General Codrington, who represented King George.¬† He seemed deeply moved and pressing it to his heart said: “These blood¬† stains make this seem a human thing.” He then told of this Sash having¬† been worn by. Braddock’s father, who fought with distinction under¬† Marlborough. In the corner is woven the date “1709.”

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Annual Report (1920) Mount Vernon Ladies Association, page 15

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Washington Landmark¬† —¬† At the forks of a road near Winchester, Va., was once a conspicuous
sign-post directing travelers on their way.¬†This became familiar to George Washington, who frequently journeyed¬†in that part of the country.¬† Very little of the original sign-post survived‚ÄĒenough, however, to
attract the notice of the Vice-Regent for Alabama, and she obtained, by  permission of the Acting-Regent, some Mount Vernon lumber for its restoration.

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Annual Report (1920) Mount Vernon Ladies Association. page 38

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Date of this Photo?

braddock sash at cork street GW hq 2

Click on photo to enlarge. From Page 73, Katherine Glass Greene’s Winchester Virginia And Its Beginnings 1743-1814,¬† originally published 1926, reproduced by Heritage Books, Westminster MD in year 2007

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Not exactly sure when that famous photo of those girls on that day of The Braddock Memorial commemoration, holding up the Braddock Sash was taken. Maybe before the event of commemorating the Braddock Cannon on 27 May 1915?

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¬†Here are their names as Katherine Glass Greene on Page 57 of ¬†‚ÄúWinchester Virginia And Its Beginnings 1743-1814‚ÄĚ,¬†lists them, presumably from left to right: Colleen Hughes Glass, Mary Greenway Russell, Virginia Tayloe Boyd, Judith Braxton McGuire, Ellen Fauntleroy Baker, Susan Davis Lougheed Carson.

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The Winchester Evening Star, 26 May 1915, front page lists the parents of these children.

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26 May 1915 front page Braddock Sash girls 26 May 1915 front page Braddock Sash girls enlarged

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 Click on all photos  to enlarge and then backspace key to return here.

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The Sash is now at MT Vernon.

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Links for further research

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All correspondence between GW and Orme

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All correspondence between GW and his brother John Augustine Washington

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A 1759 GW Christmas

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FOUNDERS ONLINE GEORGE WASHINGTON PAPERS

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GW’S WILL

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Handley Library Stewart Bell Jr Archives pictures of old Winchester VA homes

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A saved letter from Zachary Taylor in 1828

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Letters of Zachary Taylor during the Mexican War

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More letters of Zachary Taylor (letter from Chicakpoo Indians, letter warning of assassination)

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For later follow up on Braddock Cannon and the displaying of sash by Sara Knox Wood

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A little background story on Zachary Taylor

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Zachary Taylor Anecdote book

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Link on Escape into Dreams, Taylor and Wood ancestry

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The Papers of Jefferson DAvis 1808-1840, pub 1971, revised 1991, marriage of Sarah Knox Taylor Davis to Jefferson Davis, p 487

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genealogy on Sarah Knox Wood 1901 notes

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http://collections.mnhs.org/MNHistoryMagazine/articles/30/v30i02p097-110.pdf

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…………………….
http://www.gutenberg.us/articles/sarah_knox_taylor

Sarah Knox Taylor (March 6, 1814 ‚Äď September 15, 1835) was the oldest daughter of Zachary Taylor, who was a career military officer during her life and later became President of the United States. She met Jefferson Davis when living with her father and family at Fort Crawford during the Black Hawk War. They married in 1835 and she died three months later of malaria.

Sarah was given the nickname “Knoxie”, which originated from her middle name and from Fort Knox II in Vincennes, Indiana, where she was born. In the early 1830s, her father commanded Fort Crawford at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and was involved in waging the Black Hawk War. His wife and children were living there with him.

At age 17, Sarah fell in love with Jefferson Davis, a recent graduate of the United States Military Academy and a lieutenant, who was second to General Taylor at the fort. Davis was transferred to St. Louis in 1833, yet managed to keep in contact with the woman whom he wished to marry. Taylor admired Davis for his soldiering skills, but opposed the romantic match. The Taylors’ older daughter had already married Army surgeon Robert C. Wood, and they were raising three young children in a desolate frontier outpost. Together with their own experience, the Taylors felt that the military life was too hard and did not want Sarah to be an Army wife

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https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19220521&id=Yp1QAAAAIBAJ&sjid=TiEEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6161,2448028&hl=en

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Taylor’s war letters, page on Betty

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Taylor family ancestry flow chart

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