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May
29

FAIRFAX COUNTY VA

By
When:
June 17, 2017 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
2017-06-17T10:00:00-04:00
2017-06-17T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Fairfax County Courthouse
4000 Chain Bridge Rd
Fairfax, VA 22030
USA

Compiled, written by Jim Moyer, updated May 27, 2017, 6/7/2017, 6/10/2017

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Virginia Regiment Capt. George Mercer Company*  is listed as a participant on this website.

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See George Mercer bio here.

See Captain George Mercer Company here.

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FAIRFAX COUNTY ANNIVERSARY

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Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron (1693–1781), proprietor of the Northern Neck.

Fairfax County was formed in 1742

from the northern part

of Prince William County.

It was named for

Thomas Fairfax,

6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron

(1693–1781), proprietor of

the Northern Neck.

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The Fairfax family name is derived

from the Old English phrase

for “blond hair” – Faeger-feahs.  …

In 1757,

the northwestern two-thirds

of Fairfax County

became Loudoun County “

–  Wikipedia.

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Map from wikipedia

Fairfax County will

mark its 275th anniversary

with events celebrating our history.

The signature celebration

of the anniversary

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will take place on

June 17, 2017 

from 10am-4pm

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This is not a still photo. Navigate Google Car with your Mouse or Touchscreen.

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in the area surrounding the

Historic Fairfax Courthouse

located in central Fairfax.

And for this special day,

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Nicholas Fairfax, 14th Lord Fairfax of Cameron

Lord and Lady Fairfax

will be attending the celebration

as our honored guests

all the way from England. . .

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Links on

Nicholas Fairfax, 14th Lord Fairfax of Cameron

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Fairfax,_14th_Lord_Fairfax_of_Cameron

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More on the current Lord Fairfax –

http://www.hawki.co/security-risk-management/nicholas-fairfax–lord-fairfax-of-cameron-

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Fairfax County Militia Recruited


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George Washington writes from Winchester to Robert Dinwiddie, 3 May 1756:

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There are now in Town about one hundred and fifty of the Fairfax Militia…

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SO,

WHY is the

Mercer Company of the Virginia Regiment

showing up?

Here?

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We’re recruiting.

Just like we did 261 years ago.

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See a letter about recruits from Fairfax and Prince William Counties:

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To George Washington  From Thomas Bryan Martin  writing from Greenway Court. Jany 4: [1756].

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Dr Sir.

The Bearer hereof Capt. Bailis is now going up to Joyn the Prince Wm Detatchment, by Order of Colo: Lee he Applyd to me for a discharge which I Refusd, as I daly Expect to hear from you.1 He Informs me that the Men are almost Naked and as the Expence of mentaining them is very great, I think they ought to be discharged, as soon as it can be done with Safty. I am Sir Your very Humbl. Servt

B. Martin

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On 19 Oct. Fairfax reported to Dinwiddie that 256 militiamen from Fairfax, Culpeper, and Prince William counties were in the town.

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As Martin indicated in his letter, the Prince William contingent was at this time still on the frontier beyond Winchester. John and William Baylis both were captains in the Prince William militia.

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Source:

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Editor’s Note:

Martin mistakenly dated the letter 1755 instead of 1756.

MARCH 25, 1751 was the old beginning of that year..

JANUARY 1, 1752  is now the new beginning of the year.

Maybe the wrong dating of the year  in the letter just goes to a habit Martin had.

See Calendar Change.

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See this  link Captain George Mercer

who also was Colonel George Washington’s aide de camp.

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About the Current Lord Fairfax


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May 30, 1985

Lord Fairfax, for whose family Virginia’s most populous county and its county-seat city and this San Francisco suburb are named, still lives.
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No, he’s not the same Lord Thomas Fairfax, Baron Cameron, who in colonial days was proprietor of all Northern Virginia, and a friend and neighbor of George Washington.
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The current Lord Fairfax, Baron Cameron — by given name Nicholas John Albert Fairfax, age 29 — is a stockbroker in London. The 14th in his line, he never has visited either of the places that bear his name (or the Fairfax neighborhoods of Oakland and Los Angeles, for that matter), and didn’t even know of this California town’s existence until Patricia Arrigoni, a local resident, contacted him.Arrigoni, writing last month in this county’s local daily, the Marin Independent Journal, recounted her search for Lord Fairfax while on a study program in Britain a few years back.
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A friend checked a reference book and found that there was a young Lord Fairfax living in Holyport, a town in Berkshire, north of London. Arrigoni reported:”We found our way down a narrow country lane to a gatehouse which identified the Fairfax house. A long sweeping driveway led up to the red brick manor house set amid acres of manicured lawns and colorful gardens.”
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The lord’s younger brother answered a knock on the door and said “the lord’s not here,” and invited her to return, which she never did.

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But she later sent the Fairfaxes

a local guidebook that contained information

about Charles Snowden Fairfax,

the Virginia-born 10th generation heir

who declined the lordship

and who came to California in 1849

and bequeathed his name to this town.

(Charles Fairfax’s nephew returned

from Virginia to Britain to claim the title,

and his heirs have carried it on.)

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“Although the British Fairfax family knew all about Fairfax, Va.,” Arrigoni wrote, “they did not know anything about Fairfax, Calif.

“We corresponded briefly . . . with the current lord and I asked if he knew the name of the Fairfax Lord who had returned to England and resumed the title. He replied a couple of months later from London. He said he had gotten married, was living in London and worked as a broker in the stock exchange.”

He said it was his grandfather, Albert, who returned to England in 1908 to claim the title.

Fascinating. Arrigoni offered in her article to host the incumbent lord if he should ever find his way to California. Wouldn’t it be great fun if Fairfax County, Va., were to find some excuse — is there a fund to promote tourism? — to invite Lord Nicholas Fairfax for a high-panoply ceremonial visit, and then send him on a super-saver trip out here to California. Metro Scene would go along for the ride.

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1985/05/30/lord-fairfax-lives/59589162-8648-4d70-b3cc-975068e3cdf8/?utm_term=.04fd3862be60

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More on the Current and Real Lord Fairfax

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Fairfax,_14th_Lord_Fairfax_of_Cameron

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The honorary Lord Fairfaxes

http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/mountvernon/lord_and_lady.htm

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http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/braddock/awardrecipients/lordandladyfairfax.htm

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Captain Mercer Company

of the Virginia Regiment at the

275th Anniversary of Fairfax County


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General Braddock with the Virginia Blues enjoying the 275th Anniversary of Fairfax County Virginia

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General Braddock with the Virginia Blues.

The breeches (pants) were red in 1755, but blue later.

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Scroll down until you see information about uniform in this link.

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For more about the origin of the phrase Virginia Blues.

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The Birginia Blues enjoying the 275th Anniversary of Fairfax County Virginia

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Click on all photos to enlarge.

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George Washington and the VA Regiment relationship to Fairfax County


This section is under construction

 

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Washington’s recruiting in Fairfax Co.

but not Mercer

3. When the Indians killed Virginia settlers beyond Winchester at the end of September, Lt. Col. Adam Stephen sent out a call for militia to aid the garrison at Fort Cumberland and the ranger companies on the frontier in providing some protection to the terrified inhabitants, particularly between Winchester and the South Branch of the Potomac, but only a few militiamen from Augusta and Frederick counties responded to the call. On 8 Oct. GW asked for a troop of horse from the militia of Prince William County to be sent up to Winchester and another to be raised from the militia of Fairfax County “to March at an hour’s warning” (GW to Henry Lee, to John Carlyle). The Prince William militia was at this time still stationed on the South Branch of the Potomac (Thomas Bryan Martin to GW, 4 Jan. 1756). The Sparks version of the text omits the parentheses in “(which were Militia)” and changes “were” to “was,” and the printed version substitutes commas for parentheses.

4Morris wrote to GW on 2 Feb. in some detail about the measures being taken for the defense of Pennsylvania. GW was in Winchester on 10 Jan. and in Alexandria 12 Jan.

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To John Carlyle from George Washington

[Fredericksburg, 8 October 1755]

To Major John Carlyle, of Fairfax County.

From the concurring Accounts from Will’s-Creek, we have reason to believe, that a greater number of men is wanting than what we are able to Muster at present: it would therefore be advisable to order a Troop of Horse of your County, to hold themselves in Readiness to March at an hours warning, in case they should receive such Orders from Lord Fairfax, with whom I expect to be, as soon as the distance &c. can possibly admit.1 I am &c.

G:W.

It would be advisable, if they do come, to bring eight or ten Days provision with them.

Fredericksburgh: October 8th 1755.

LB, DLC:GW.

1. John Carlyle had been an officer in the Fairfax County militia since 1750 and seems to have held a major’s commission in the militia at this time. He was promoted to colonel later in this same year.

http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-02-02-0084

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LB, DLC:GW.

Henry Lee (1729–1787) of Leesylvania was county lieutenant of Prince William. As such, he had repeated dealings with Colonel Washington of the Virginia Regiment during the next three years. The two began their long careers in the House of Burgesses together in 1758, and GW’s friendly relations with Colonel Lee and his children, who included “Light Horse Harry” Lee, endured until GW’s death.

1. No militia from Prince William had shown up by 17 Oct., but on 19 Oct. Lord Fairfax reported to Dinwiddie that a total of 256 militiamen had come to Winchester from Fairfax, Culpeper, and Prince William counties. See GW to Dinwiddie, 17 Oct. 1755; and Dinwiddie to William Fairfax, 20 Oct. 1755, in Brock, Dinwiddie Papers description begins R. Alonzo Brock, ed. The Official Records of Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony of Virginia, 1751–1758. 2 vols. Richmond, 1883–84. description ends , 2:252.

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To George Washington

4 January 1756

From Thomas Bryan Martin

Greenway Court. Jany 4: [1756].

Dr Sir.

The Bearer hereof Capt. Bailis is now going up to Joyn the Prince Wm Detatchment, by Order of Colo: Lee he Applyd to me for a discharge which I Refusd, as I daly Expect to hear from you.1 He Informs me that the Men are almost Naked and as the Expence of mentaining them is very great, I think they ought to be discharged, as soon as it can be done with Safty. I am Sir Your very Humbl. Servt

B. Martin

ALS, DLC:GW. Martin mistakenly dated the letter 1755 instead of 1756.

1. In early Oct. 1755, after receiving word of the Indian raids south of the Potomac not far from Fort Cumberland, Thomas, Lord Fairfax, asked Col. Henry Lee, county lieutenant of Prince William, to send 100 militiamen up to Winchester. On 19 Oct. Fairfax reported to Dinwiddie that 256 militiamen from Fairfax, Culpeper, and Prince William counties were in the town. As Martin indicates here, the Prince William contingent was at this time still on the frontier beyond Winchester. John and William Baylis both were captains in the Prince William militia.

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12 July 1756 order

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4th Company Captain George Mercer
Lt Bryan Fairfax
Ensign Denis McCarty

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George Mercer’s company:

Angus McDonald, enl. 5 Mar. 1754 in King George County, 21, 5′10″, seaman, from Scotland;

John Matthews, enl. 12 Jan. 1755 in Dinwiddie County, 43, 6′, sawyer, English, “knocked Knees & Speaks thick”;

John Grinnon, enl. 25 Nov. 1754 in Stafford County, 19, 5′10″, carpenter, Virginian;

Samuel French, enl. 1 Dec. 1754 in Fairfax County, 27, 5′10″, sawyer, from Maryland;

John Pope, enl. 22 Dec. 1754 in Prince William County, 18, 5′7″, carpenter, Virginian, “a fresh Look”;

Benjamin Barrett, enl. 18 May 1756 in Prince George County, 24, 5′7″, seaman, Irish (2 Aug. 1756, DLC:GW).

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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-03-02-0238#GEWN-02-03-02-0238-fn-0001

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reference to sash and uniform and mercer in Charleston about the uniform

http://boston1775.blogspot.com/2013/06/

http://boston1775.blogspot.com/search/label/George%20Mercer

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George Mercer and Stamp Act

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George Mercer (1733-1784), a former military companion of George Washington, was first hanged and burnt in effigy in Westmoreland County on 24 Sept 1765. Richard Henry Lee (shown here) led that protest, ordering his slaves to cart the effigy around and reportedly himself playing the part of a clergyman taking its confession before execution.

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Mercer arrived in Virginia in the last week of October 1765. On the evening of 30 October, newspapers reported, he reached the colonial capital of Williamsburg.

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Rather than stick around, Mercer headed back to Britain, warning the imperial government that the Stamp Act was unenforceable. Sympathetic bureaucrats there appear to have leaked letters to him showing that another Virginian had applied for the job of stamp master months before: none other than Richard Henry Lee.

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http://boston1775.blogspot.com/search/label/George%20Mercer

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On 21 Nov 1765, the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston News-Letter ran this item from Nova Scotia in a roundup of reports on protests against the Stamp Act:

At the late Exhibition of a Stamp man’s Effigies at Halifax, were the following Labels: On the Stamp-man’s Breast, was affixed his Confession, viz.

Behold me hanging on this cursed Tree,
Example to those who would Stamp men be.
It was for the Sake of Gain I took this Place;
The more the Shame, O pity my sad Case.
B—e was the Auther of this cursed Act,
And what I say, you may depend is Fact.
But alas! the Devil is too sly;
Instead of Gain has left me here to die.

Whosoever carries this away is an Enemy to his Country.

What greater Glory can this Country see
Than a Stamp-master hanging on a Tree.

On one Pocket the following. B—e’s Speech:

O mourn with me my poor and wretched State
I now repent; but alas! too late.
America I sought to overthrow,
By stamping them to Death, you all must know,
But Pitt o’erthrew my Schemes, did me confound,
And brought my favourite Stamp-Act to the Ground.

On the Stamp-man’s Right Arm, A.H.
On a Board Lord B——e with Satan dictating him.

The hanging effigies strung with poetic labels, the blame for the Earl of Bute and praise for William Pitt, the invocation of the devil—those were all elements of the standard anti-Stamp iconography established in Boston on 14 August.

The most distinctive detail about the Halifax effigy was the label with initials “A.H.” That pointed to Nova Scotia’s stamp agent, Archibald Hinshelwood.

Another deviation from the norm was that the Halifax protesters never got around to burning their effigy. It went up on 12 October, hung overnight, and, despite its warning label, was carried away by two gentlemen for disposal in the morning.

To assess Isaiah Thomas’s account of this demonstration, the most important detail is the date. Halifax’s protest took place two weeks before the Stamp Act was to take effect and eight weeks before Thomas issued his first issue of the Halifax Gazette with mourning bands. His actions as a young printer therefore could not have prompted the action.

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http://boston1775.blogspot.com/search/label/Stamp%20Act

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Lord Fairfax  and handley library

http://handley.pastperfectonline.com/bysearchterm?keyword=paintings

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https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=foundersonline+recruiting+in+fairfax+county&spf=1496078200424

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