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Mar
18

George Washington Hotel Events

By
When:
May 19, 2017 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
2017-05-19T18:00:00-04:00
2017-05-19T21:00:00-04:00
Where:
George Washington Hotel, a Wyndham International Resorts Hotel
103 E Piccadilly St
Winchester, VA 22601
USA
Cost:
50.00

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Compiled, written by Jim Moyer  3/18/2017, 3/20/2017, 3/23/2017, 4/5-6/2017

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George Washington Hotel Events

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Please join

The French and Indian War Foundation

of Winchester

as we present a

Lecture & Dinner Event

with speaker

Erica Nuckles, Historian

Friday, May 19, 2017

6 ‐ 9 pm

The George Washington Hotel

Ballroom

103 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester, VA

Full Cash Bar & Dinner

$50 per person (non‐refundable)

($20 is tax-deductible as a contribution to a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization)

Limited Seating ‐ Advance Reservations Required

Please RSVP by May 5th

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RSVP     Reply by May 5, 2017

Put your name here ___________________________

Regular Meal (Entrée Braised Short Ribs of Beef with a Demi Glace)

Special Dietary Meal (Please indicate)

Seating is Limited Paid, Advance Reservations Required (nonrefundable)

Please remit payment along with a printout of this RSVP to

FIWF, P.O. Box 751, Winchester, VA 22601

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or email this to  fiwf.dsg@comcast.net

with all the info above in your email RSVP

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So this story you’re going to hear with a fine meal?

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Erica Nuckles  Historian

on Charlotte Browne

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For all Pictures, left click to enlarge. Hit backspace arrow to return here.

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What we got here is a first hand eye witness  account.

An eye witness of the Braddock Expedition.

Like hacking email on a server, we got some goodies

in Charlotte Browne’s diary.

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That Braddock Street in Winchester VA you drive on every day?

That’s the guy  whose expedition Charlotte Browne joins

which meets a grisly end.

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And the location of that grisly end?

Well,  you know that Braddock Cannon

on  the Corner of Braddock and Cork?

That Cannon points you to  that grisly end’s location.

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And the skulls were mostly what was left 3 years later.

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Charlotte didn’t go all the way, having stopped at Fort Cumberland.

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But she saw the refugees from that horror.

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So come and see what she saw.

Erica Knuckles, our speaker, will tell you.

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Battle of the Wilderness Virginia 1864. this may have been what it looked in 1758 when the men of Forbes Expedition after celebrating their victory over Fort Duquesne, did the grim hike to their own past 3 years ago.

Back to that word that caught your eye – The skulls.

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The Forbes Expedition follows up on this scene 3 years later.

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The French gave up, leaving a burnt ghost of a fort, November 1758, three years after Braddock’s disaster.

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And now the victors will march to Braddock field.

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It is their first chance after 3 years to see their fallen comrads.

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In Volume 2, Young George Washington, published by Charles Scribner and Sons, 1948,  pages 366-367, Douglas Southall Freeman writes:

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“…a service of thanksgiving on the 26th with a sermon, a day of celebration on the 27th, and then a solemn march to Braddock’s field, where the skulls of more than 450 men were buried. Their bones long before had been scattered by wolves.”

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A Hallowed Halloween of a site greeted our Forbes Expedition victors.

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See  wolf behavior.  

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BACK TO  CHARLOTTE BROWNE


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Some excerpts and abridged quotes from source:

http://whilbr.org/itemdetail.aspx?idEntry=8085

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Charlotte Bristowe Browne

had been widowed

by the time she was appointed

Matron of the General Hospital

for the Braddock expedition.

As she had left her children in England,

she would later learn of her daughter’s death

In England while serving at Fort Cumberland…”

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A ship bringing passengers to North America in the 1750s From Braddock’s Defeat: Part 6

In November 1754

Charlotte and her brother, who was an apothecary,

had sailed on the ship “London”,

part of the fleet transporting

the 44th and 48th British regiments

Braddock was to arrive earlier

at Fort Cumberland on May 10th.

Braddock departed  Fort Cumberland on June 9th, 1755.

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[Ed. Note: There seems to be some contradictions here. The London ship doesn’t appear in the list of HMS His Majesty’s Ships. So the London might be a merchant ship. And it looks like Charlotte came to North America preceding the 2 regiments.]

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On the 1st of June 1755, Nurse Browne, her brother, two nurses, a servant, two cooks and fifty sick soldiers in wagons headed for Fort Cumberland. As the group approached Cresap’s Fort in Oldtown, Maryland. she wrote in her journal:

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“the road was so rough that it nearly disjoined me. I walked till my feet were blister’d.”

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Upon arriving at Fort Cumberland, just a few days after Braddock had already departed on his march to Fort Duquesne, she wrote: “the most desolate place I ever saw – the fort has no internal water supply and is crowded with wives of the enlisted men and local families who sought protection from the local Indian attack.”

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2 Excerpts  from Charlotte Browne’s diary:

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Maryland – Toward Fort CumberlandJune 12 (1755)At 2 in the morning the drum beat, but I could have wish’d it to have stay’d a few hours longer, being very sleepy. We marched but there is no describing the badness of the roads. I walked as far as I was able. The poor horses no longer regard the smack of the whip or beat of the drum, and as to Black (Charlotte’s horse) she could go on no further. 2 of the waggons broke down. At 10 we came to the river (Potomac) and waited 6 hours before we could ferry over. At 8 at night we halted at a Rattlesnake Colonels nam’d Crisop. Had for supper some lamb, to drink some bad wine, which was but 5s. a quart! I could get no bed so went to my wagon

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“History of Cumberland, Maryland”, 1878, by William Lowdermilk wikipedia article

Maryland-Toward Fort CumberlandJune 13 (1755)At 3 few march’d but I was so ill I could not hold up my head. 3 of the waggons broke down at 4 in the afternoon. Mr. Bass came to meet us and gave me some letters from England. At 6 we came to Fort Cumberland the most desolate place I ever saw. Went to Mr. Cherrington who receive’d me kindly, drank tea and then went to the Governor to apply for quarters. I was put into a Hole that I could see daylight through every Log, and a port hole for a window; which was as good a room as any in the fort.”

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Nurse Browne worked tirelessly caring for the sick that remained at the fort during the campaign and nursed the sick, wounded and dying who arrived back at the fort on July 15 after Braddock’s defeat on July 9th at the Battle of the Monongahela six miles south of present day Pittsburgh.

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A few days later her brother died with a fever.

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She nursed the sick at the fort until following the retreating soldiers to Frederick, Maryland then on to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and finally to a hospital in Albany, New York.

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She ended her journal in August of 1757, too overwhelmed with work to write any further. What happened to Charlotte Browne is unknown, but her diary has survived to provide glimpses  . . . of long days laboring in a fort in … Cumberland, Maryland.

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From source:

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http://whilbr.org/itemdetail.aspx?idEntry=8085

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http://www.encyclopedia.com/defense/energy-government-and-defense-magazines/brown-charlotte-diary-nurse

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The Lecture

Remarks on a March

Gender and Rank during the French and Indian War

Historian Erica Nuckles will describe the remarkable physical and

psychological journey of Charlotte Browne, a British widow and

mother who left her children in London to serve as matron (i.e.,

head nurse) for General Edward Braddock’s illfated expedition to

the Monongahela in 1755 during the French and Indian War. A

woman of what was then known as the “middling rank” (what we

would call today middle class), Browne kept a journal of her

experience that provides a unique, female perspective on the F&I

War. While Browne’s motivations and expectations were typical

of a middling British woman during the mideighteenth century,

her life was anything but. Join us as historian Nuckles explores

this fascinating woman’s experiences in the F&I War.

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Speaker, Erica Nuckles

A native of Pittsburgh, PA, Erica Nuckles is the Director of

History & Collections at Fort Ligonier in Ligonier, PA. She holds

a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Wyoming; a M.A.

in Museum Studies from the George Washington University; and

is a doctoral candidate at the University at Albany, SUNY

working towards completion of her dissertation on Charlotte

Browne’s experience during the French and Indian War. Ms.

Nuckles is an alumna of the 2013 Yale Public History Institute and

has previously worked at Crailo State Historic Site: The Museum

of the Colonial Dutch in the Hudson River Valley in Rensselaer,

NY; the Carlyle House Historic Park in Alexandria, VA; the DAR

Museum in Washington, DC; and Bushy Run Battlefield in

Jeannette, PA

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NOTES AND LINKS

FOR FURTHER RESEARCH


 

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Charlotte Brown’s diary

http://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16124coll1/id/9912

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The regiment was renamed the 44th Regiment of Foot in 1751 when British regiments ceased to be named for their Colonels. The regiment saw active service overseas in North America and participated in the French and Indian War and in the American Revolution. Notably, the regiment fought at Braddock’s defeat (1755), the Battle of Carillon (1758), the Battle of Brooklyn (1776), the Battle of Brandywine (1777), and the Battle of Monmouth (1778).

In 1782, most British regiments of foot were given county designations, and the 44th became known as the 44th, or East Essex Regiment of Foot.

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Source:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/BUTTON-BOUTON-BOTON-INGLES-THE-44th-REGIMENT-OF-FOOT-THE-ESSEX-WELLINGTON-/301851762544

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http://triblive.com/news/westmoreland/8525511-74/nuckles-history-fort#axzz3dtnPVEIZ

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From a letter by Judge J.Yeates, August 21, 1775 Hazard’s History, Reg. p 105.

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http://www.discoverwildlife.com/animals/birds/which-animals-eat-bone-and-how-do-they-do-it

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https://books.google.com/books?id=811oCgAAQBAJ&pg=PA112&lpg=PA112&dq=DO+WOLVES+CHEW+SKULLS&source=bl&ots=KSBJT6uR5o&sig=4_BYfB9SLNObcMiA1uk1IDTD2Fo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwizuoWbt-bSAhXIRiYKHcfrCXUQ6AEISzAL#v=onepage&q=DO%20WOLVES%20CHEW%20SKULLS&f=false

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