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Aug
24

Going to the WELL

By
When:
May 31, 2013 all-day
2013-05-31T00:00:00-04:00
2013-06-01T00:00:00-04:00
Where:
Fort Loudoun
419 N Loudoun St
Winchester, VA 22601
USA
Cost:
Free

SEEING THE WELL FOR THE FIRST TIME IN YEARS

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Drilling holes through a 5 inch thick slab of cement installed in the 1930s.

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May 31, 2013

First time for human eyes to look inside this well for about 80 years.

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July 25 Thursday 2013

A camera went below the water in the well and found sediment built up 75 feet down. The Well is recorded by Washington and his men to have been blasted down to 103 feet.

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Then later this same year of 2013, when trying to dig post holes for the new historical sign, what did these modern interlopers find from the past? ROCK. SOLID ROCK.

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Just like George Washington’s men who didn’t just “dig” but rather BLASTED the rock with black powder down 103 feet.

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See videos about this on this link –

http://jimmoyer1.wixsite.com/fortloudounva/blank-c1tej

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See Scott Straub’s research on the man behind this well.

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SUBSURFACE TECHNOLOGIES INC

put a camera down this well July 25, 2013

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The video begins 75 feet down where sediment is encountered and retreats towards top of well.

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Below is the Winchester Star article on this company and how they went about this.

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TIMELINE OF DIGGING THE WELL

As George Washington became more acquainted with this “miner”, this well digger, did he get the man’s name right after awhile?

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From Handley Archives. Sketch by James E Taylor, embedded with Sheridan on the 3rd Battle of Winchester 1864. This artist in the midst of war tracked down the story of Fort Loudoun and its Well. He also tracked down the story of Braddock’s Sash.

August 29, 1756

Paid a Dutchman for a bucket to the well. (Quarles notes: No doubt the well at Fort Loudoun)

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April 1, 1757

Paid Christian Heintz in part for digging well in Fort Loudoun

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July 5, 1757

To Christopher Heintz – well digger

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August 27, 1757

To John Christian Heintz – well digger

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October 7, 1757

To John Christopher Heintz – well digger

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April 22, 1758

To John Christopher Heintz – for working in barracks yard 16 days in blowing rock – digging 48 feet in well of Fort Loudoun

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Source:   ALL DATES from page 37 of George Washington and Winchester Virginia 1748 to 1758 by Garland Quarles, Volume VIII of Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society Papers

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February 23, 1758

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Lt Smith writes from Fort Loudoun to George Washington who is at Mt Vernon trying to get well from his dysentery, that the well now 90 feet in depth had been been almost filled with water but was now cleared (frustrated most likely by seepage and runoff) and the digging resumed. Lt Charles Smith adds,” I Cant Say that there Is any Likelihood of any Spring.”

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Page 27 Quarles and Page 44 of Fort Loudoun, Washington’s Fort in Virginia, Norman Baker.

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October 12, 1758, Lt Charles Smith writes, the well reaches 103 feet.And miner is owed payment.  Pages 50-51, Norman Baker

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1932 Cartoon


 

Gasoline Alley. Nationally syndicated cartoon printed Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) · printed Tue, Jun 28, 1932

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Found by Stevan Resan, French and Indian War Foundation VP, Board of Directors Member.

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Back to The Well Fort Loudoun Winchester VA.

Sunday Word.

by Jim Moyer

We’re going back to the Well again. Because of a cartoon.

Fort Loudoun’s Well still exists — Blasted by black powder from 1756 to 1758 because the whole hill is limestone bedrock.

We’re going back to the Well because of a 1932 nationally syndicated cartoon.

Gasoline Alley. Nationally syndicated cartoon printed Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) · printed Tue, Jun 28, 1932

Foxy idea? The character on the far right says. But is this true?

Steve Resan? Or is this James Wood? Steve Resan is VP on the Board of the French and Indian War Foundation.

This cartoon by Gasoline Alley from Argus-Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) printed Tue, Jun 28, 1932 was forwarded by Steve Resan, French and Indian War Foundation Board member.

He impersonates James Wood on many occasions.

1932. GW was born in 1732. Bicentennial of GW’s birth year.

This was a time in American History when The People knew way more about their founding. For example in 1836, Warren County is named after Dr Warren, a patriot.

The Heights of Quebec (leading to the Plains of Abraham above) is a reference the movie makes to this battle. This battle ended in both opposing Generals dying. Memorialized by a famous Benjamin West painting of General Wolfe dying that captured the epic quality of this world war.
Or how about this example:
“You Sound like General Wolfe before the Heights of Quebec.”
Here is a 1939 movie, It’s A Wonderful World, (not to be confused with It’s A Wonderful Life) where the memory of a famous battle in the French and Indian War was popular enough in the American culture that Claudette Colbert could say such a thing to Jimmy Stewart and the audience would know what the reference meant.
BTW, Winchester VA’s Wolfe Street is named after that General.
That painting popularized his memory.
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Back to the Well.

A little more about that Well.

After 2 years of blasting and digging rock

from 1756 to 1758

Did they find a spring?

Norman Baker, our historian says No.

But the well is full of water.

Water Table?

The Civil War Artist James E Taylor, embedded with the Sheridan Campaign after the Third Battle of Winchester draws a pictures of a Yankee looking the Well, blasted and dug by Colonel George Washington’s men for Fort Loudoun 1756 to 1758

Lt Charles Smith writes from Fort Loudoun to GW who is dealing with dysentery at Mt Vernon on February the 23d 1758:

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“The well has been allmost full of Water But now is Cleared and they are at Work in it A Gain And there is Near Ninety foot deep. I Cant Say that there Is any Likelyhood of Any Spring,…”

Source: https://founders.archives.gov/docum…

Read Scott Straub’s research on the Miner blasting this Well.

http://frenchandindianwarfoundation.org/…

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First time for Human Eyes in how many Years?

Drilling holes through a 5 inch thick slab of cement installed in the 1930s. First time for human eyes to look inside this well for about 80 years. May 31, 2013

Then on July 25 Thursday 2013, a camera went below the water in the well and found sediment built up 75 feet down. The Well is recorded by Washington and his men to have been blasted down to 103 feet.

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http://jimmoyer1.wixsite.com/fortloudounva/blank-c1tej

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