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May
11

Grantsville – Braddock Road

By
When:
May 12, 2018 all-day
2018-05-12T00:00:00-04:00
2018-05-13T00:00:00-04:00
Where:
Casselman River Bridge State Park
10240 National Pike, Grantsville, MD 21536
USA

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3rd Annual Festival


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See article on 3rd Annual Festival:

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https://www.wvnews.com/garrettrepublican/news/third-annual-grantsville-national-road-festival-planned/article_e9537b0b-a21a-5e57-81c3-9cc987c9b644.html

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Website for event:

https://www.evensi.us/grantsville-national-road-festival-historic-presentation/207734588

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Facebook pages on this event:

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https://www.facebook.com/NationalRoadFestival/

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Look for pictures and videos of the Virginia Regiment’s Captain George Mercer Company (this company was headquartered at Fort Loudoun Winchester VA)  at this 3rd annual event held by Grantsville Maryland:

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https://www.facebook.com/groups/216655545353565/

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compiled by Jim Moyer 5/10/2018, 5/12/2018, 5/13/2018, 5/14/2018

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Where is this re-enactment?

 May 12, 2018

Grantsville MD


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This sign, Little Crossing is right inside the Casselman River Bridge State Park.

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This park is where the reincarnations, the living history interpreters,  the re-enactors, those interested in this historical moment assembled.

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Go right to spot where this sign is — click on “Frontier Forts Google Maps.”   Click on icon to see more info.

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Where are the

Historical Markers?


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The Little Crossings

N 39° 41.811 W 079° 08.572
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The sign reads:

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“”The Little Crossings”
(of the Little Youghiogeny River
now called Castleman’s River)So called by George Washington when he crossed on June 19, 1755, with General Edward Braddock on the ill-fated expedition to Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh).”

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Source:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMGC1Y_The_Little_Crossings_Grantsville_Md

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(No letters with GW on Founders Online after June 14 until 23 June 1755)

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This sign, Little Crossing is right inside the Casselman River Bridge State Park.  See location of sign:

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https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1trymtX5rGYDjQ_tYJUvv63wqc1M&ll=39.69660640000001%2C-79.1442753&z=18

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Little Meadows

The 4th Camp since Fort Cumberland

N 39° 41.491 W 079° 05.665
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Go right to spot where this sign is — click on “Frontier Forts Google Maps.”

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Text of this sign is in italics:

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General Braddock’s 4th camp on the march to Fort Duquesne June 17, 1755.

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(No letters with GW on Founders Online after June 14 until 23 June 1755)

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Washington arrived here after Braddock’s defeat July 15th, 1755.

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(No letters with GW on Founders Online after 9 July 1755 until 17 July 1755 and letters about Braddock’s Defeat 18 July 1755)

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Washington also stopped here

May 9th, 1754<– more on GW’s famous journal

July 7th or 8th, 1754 <– soon after Fort Necessity

October 1st, 1770,    <— more on GW’s 1770 trip

November 26th, 1770 <– more on Guyasuta

September 10, 1784.  <– Founders Online GW Diary

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http://www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM1T4_little-meadows_Grantsville-MD.html

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http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMQRV_Little_Meadows.

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PREVIOUS CAMPS:


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Savage River Camp

3rd Camp since leaving Fort Cumberland

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See where this sign is — Click on “Frontier Forts Google Maps.”   Click on icon once map appears.

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Text of Sign:

General Braddock’s 3rd camp on his march to Fort Duquesne June 16, 1755. The route, later known as the Old Braddock Road, passes to the southeast of the National Road. Captain Orme’s diary says “we entirely demolished three wagons and shattered several” descending Savage Mountain.

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Source:

http://www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2C9_savage-river-camp_Frostburg-MD.html

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Martin’s Plantation

2nd Camp since leaving Fort Cumberland

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See where this sign is — Click on “Frontier Forts Google Maps.”   Click on icon once map appears.

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Here is where  GW becomes violently sick:

Immediately upon our leavg the C. at Geors. Ck the 14th Inst. (from whe I wrote to yo.)1 I was siezd wt violt Fevers & Pns in my hd wch con[tinue]d wtout , Start deletion,the lt, End, Intermisn till the 23 follg when I was reliev’d by the Genls absolty ordering the Phyns to give me Doctr Jas Powder, Start deletion,wch is, End, , Start insertion,s (one of, End,the most excelt mede in the W.)2

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It was on 14 June that GW wrote to his brother Jack from Martin’s plantation near Georges Creek, but the army did not begin its march from that camp until the next morning.   – Founders Online footnote.

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Here is Source of picture  and more info on Dr James Fever Powder.

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Historical Marker sites:

www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2CI_martins-plantation_Frostburg-MD.html

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http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMGQB

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Text on Sign:

General Braddock’s 2nd camp on the march to Fort Duquesne June 14th, 15th, 1755. The old Braddock Road passed to the southeast of the National Road from Clarysville to the “Shades of Death” near “Two Mile Run.” The National Road was begun by the Government in 1811.
State Highway Commission.

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Where is Martin’s Plantation really?

Reconsidering Braddock’s Road to Martin’s by Lannie Dietle:

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This book presents significant and harmonious evidence that Braddock did not turn southwest at the confluence of Porter Run and Braddock Run, but instead followed the existing Ohio Company Road through an area later known as Eckhart Mines.

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This theory continues, drawn from the same sources, that Martin’s Plantation was located west of George’s Creek, not to the east of the drainage as previous authors have surmised.

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Blazing Braddock’s Road

N 39° 40.465′, W 78° 57.739′

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See where this sign is — Click on “Frontier Forts Google Maps.”   Click on icon once map appears.

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Text of Sign:

“We this day passed the ‘Aligany’ Mountain (Big Savage Mountain) which is a rocky ascent of more than two miles, in many places extremely steep…”

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Captain Robert Orme, June 15, 1755

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British General Edward Braddock led a 2,100-man army through this wild country in 1755. The troops intended to dislodge the French from the “Forks of the Ohio” (Pittsburgh) almost 100 miles away. They were blazing a new trail, forever known as “Braddock’s Road.”

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As they crossed this formidable mountain about a mile south of here, Braddock’s aide, Captain Robert Orme, recorded the difficulties. “Its descent is very rugged and almost perpendicular; in passing which we entirely demolished three wagons and shattered several.” After Orme listed the passage of 2100 soldiers, 30 wagons, 400 horses, siege artillery and tons of supplies, General Braddock took a young George Washington’s advice. He soon created a “flying column,” shedding most of the cumbersome equipment and moving more quickly to his objective.

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(Sidebar): Retracing General Braddock’s Route

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More than 150 years after Braddock’s march to a disastrous defeat, John Kennedy Lacock, a Harvard Professor, led an expedition to retrace the original route of Braddock’s Road. Here, Lacock

Marker atop Savage Mountain image. Click for full size.

By Christopher Busta-Peck, September 22, 2007 2. Marker atop Savage Mountain A former service station, built to serve motorists of another era, sits in the background.

and his colleagues rest near the summit of Big Savage Mountain. The old twelve-footwide road is clearly visible between them.

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Erected by America’s Byways.

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Marker series. This marker is included in the Braddock’s Road and Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock, and the The Historic National Roadmarker series.

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Location. Marker is missing. It was located near 39° 40.465′ N, 78° 57.739′ W. Marker was in Frostburg, Maryland, in Allegany County. Marker was on Historic National Road (Alternate U.S. 40), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Frostburg MD 21532, United States of America.

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Text of Sign shown in Orange is from this source:

https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=5013

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Another source:

www.historicalmarkerproject.com/markers/HM2S1_blazing-braddocks-road_Frostburg-MD.html

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A convenient list of

Braddock Road Markers:


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https://www.historicalmarkerproject.com/series/23/braddocks-road-and-maj-gen-edward-braddock.html?page=3

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or even better:

https://www.hmdb.org/results.asp?SeriesID=6

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Corrections to the

British Battles site


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This is actually a handy starting point of a site.

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However, there are corrections needed.

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Battle of Monongahela 1755 – Braddock’s Defeat

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British Forces:

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30 Sailors from the Royal Navy under Lt Spendelowe
Sir Peter Halkett’s 44th Foot
Colonel Robert Dunbar’s 48th Foot

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The following Independent Companies of Foot (part of the established British Army):

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Captain Rutherford’s New York Company

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Captain Horatio Gate’s New York Company. See more Horatio’s Gate’s Travelers Rest place near Charles Town WV.

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Captain Delamere’s South Carolina Company  <— wrong name, should be Captain Raymond Demeré 

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Train of Royal Artillery (some 60 officers and men, six 12 pounders, six 6 pounders, 4 howitzers and around 30 coehorn mortars) commanded by Captain Orde <– should be Orme

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VIRGINIA:

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Captain Stewart’s Troop of Virginia Light Horse (around 28 troopers)

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2 Companies of Virginian “Carpenters” commanded by

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Captain Polson

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Captain Mercer <– George Mercer was “Captain” in 1754 roster

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(each approx 3 officers and 50 sergeants, corporals, drummers and soldiers).

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5 Companies of Virginian Rangers (troops raised for the campaign) commanded by:

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Captains Stevens,  <–  site has Adam Stephen misspelled

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Captain Hogg,

Captain Waggoner,  <– Waggener

Captain Cocke,

Captain Perronee

(each approx 3 officers and 50 sergeants, corporals, drummers and soldiers).

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MARYLAND:

A company of Maryland Rangers commanded by Captain Dagworthy.

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(See all correspondence between GW and Dagsworthy)

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NORTH CAROLINA:

A company of Rangers from North Carolina commanded by Captain
Edward Brice Dobson  (son of Governor Brice Dobson).  <— incorrect, Dobson should be Dobbs.

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Captain Edward Brice Dobson noted here should be Captain Edward Brice Dobbs

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Governor Brice Dobson noted here, should be Governor Arthur Dobbs

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More on Edward Brice Dobbs

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A Brief History

of South Carolina

Independent Companies


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Definition: And independent company is a company which has no parent regiment. It is a company whose captain has no superior other than the King himself. In practice, though, the Secretary of State and the Secretary-at-War issued orders in the King’s name. In a colony, the governor was often empowered to issue orders to the captain of an independent company.1

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Footnote:

The American Independent Companies of the British Army 1664-1764, Foote, p 6

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Source:

http://fortloudoun.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/a-brief-history-of-independent-companies.pdf

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Conestoga Wagons

in Braddock’s Expedition


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http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29653/29653-h/29653-h.htm

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