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TRAVELER’S REST – Horatio Gates place

By
When:
July 9, 2017 all-day
2017-07-09T00:00:00-04:00
2017-07-10T00:00:00-04:00
Where:
TRAVELER'S REST
4529 Bower Rd
Kearneysville, WV 25430
USA

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The 4 yellow circle icons in the center?

They are homes of

Adam Stephen,

Horatio Gates and

Charles Lee.

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All 3 fought at Braddock’s Defeat.

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All 3 fought for Washington in the Revolution.

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All 3 have a home within several miles of each other.

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And on

Page 326 Braddock’s Defeat by David L Preston:

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By 1782, however, the once-distinguished careers of three of those generals had become tarnished by battlefield defeat (Gates), drunkenness (Stephen), or dereliction of duty (Lee).

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Further below this map, we will go over 2 remembrances Horatio Gates had of Braddock’s Defeat at his home, Traveler’s Rest.

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See links and picture on each icon.
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TRAVELER’S REST – Horatio Gates place

Still in progress 3/26/2018, updated by Jim Moyer 4/12/2018, 5/19/2018

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See pictures of house

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See Library of Congress pictures of house

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See location of the house

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The location of the Historical Marker is some distance from the house.

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Waymark website on historical marker

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Traveler’s Rest

Remembering July 9, 1755,

Braddock’s Defeat


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Penford remembers saving Horatio Gates

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Source:

Page 250 Braddock’s Defeat by David L Preston.

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Another demonstration of British bravery was how Lucorney’s commanding officer, Gates, was saved.

.Gate had been wounded by a ball that penetrated his left breast and immobilized his arm.

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Thirty years after the Monongahela, a story appeared in a newspaper about the deep gratitude that Gates felt for one of his soldiers, a man named Penfold.

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The writer was a British officer who had heard the story from Penfold, an “old soldier of the royal regiment of artillery who served me while the 18th regiment was at Fort Pitt and the Illinois.

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Penfold and Gates had both been wounded at the Monongahela and Gates was “left among the slain.” Penfold “made a shift to carry the worthy captain” off the field, and Gates always told him, “that he owed his life to me.” In the early 1770s, when Gates heard that Penfold had been “worn out” in such lengthy service, he invited him to Traveler’s Rest, Gates’s new home in Virginia: “come rest your firelock in my chimney corner, and partake with me, while I have, my savior Penfold shall not want; and it is my wish, as well as Mrs. Gates’s to see you spend the evening of your life comfortably. Mrs. Gates desires to be affectionately remembered to you.”

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The apocryphal story is altogether true in every detail save one:

the soldier’s name was Penford, not Penfold.

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Sergeant Francis Penford appears on returns and documents relating to Gates’s New York Independent Company. He had enlisted in the company in 1754 and was a witness for Gates’s last will and testament in April 1755. He remained in Gates’s company until 1760, going on to serve in the Royal Artillery with the 18th Regiment, present at Fort Pitt from 1768 to 1772, when he told his story to the unnamed British officer.

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Penford apparently returned to England and always maintained a warm affection for the Gates family.

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In addition to being wounded, Gates lost all of his horses and personal baggage in the battle, but due to Penford’s bravery, he came away with his life.

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Gates and Penford were both among the few fortunate survivors of the shattered New York Independent Company. Of the 57 officers and men who crossed the Monongahela, approximately 27 were killed in action (nearly half) and another 18 wounded, according to an unpublished return in Gates’s paper. A staggering 78 percent of the New York Independent Company detachment was slaughtered at the Monongahela.

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George Grieve and Adam Stephen 1782  visit Horatio Gates

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Source:

Page 326 Braddock’s Defeat by David L Preston.

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July 9, 1782, late in the war, English expatriate named George Grieve dined with Gates at his Virginia home, “Traveler’s Rest,” along with Adam Stephen.

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Grieve recalled that their conversation turned to the anniversary of Braddock’s Defeat as Gates and Stephen observed to him, that “no less than four of the most distinguished generals” were present in the 1755 expedition.

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By 1782, however, the once-distinguished careers of three of those generals had become tarnished by battlefield defeat (Gates), drunkenness (Stephen), or dereliction of duty (Lee).

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Per Dr David Preston’s footnote, the above is sourced from Chastelux and translated by George Grieve:

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From JAR Journal of American Revolution:

Chastellux’s two-volume work was published in its entirety in 1786.

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An English version by an anonymous translator, who was later revealed to be the Englishman George Grieve, appeared the same year. Grieve, a man of strong Whig sympathies, added explanations and not a little commentary in his footnotes.

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The American scholar Howard D. Rice Jr. edited an elegant, definitive English edition in 1963. His two volumes were published by The University of North Carolina Press and include additional commentary and clarification.[4]

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[4] In addition to offering insights into Chastellux’s life and thinking, Rice includes a portrait of translator George Grieve, “a commercial adventurer, a journalist and hack writer,” who gained some small fame as the persecutor of Madame Du Barry, the mistress of King Louis XV. Du Barry was executed in 1793 during the Reign of Terror.

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Revolutionary Tourist: Chastellux in America

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ABOUT GEORGE GRIEVE


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George Grieve wikipedia story

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Grieve

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From George Washington to George Grieve, 18 March 1782

Phila. March 18th —82

Sir,

The inclosed will introduce you to the acquaintance of Colo. Rumney—& be the mean, I expect, of obtaining information of the situation, & circumstances attending Earl Tankerville’s Estate. I am Sir Yr Most Obedt Ser.

Go: Washington

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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/99-01-02-07996

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Correspondence between

George Washington

Horatio Gates


 

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Founders Online list of letters between Washington and Gates:

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https://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Washington%2C%20George%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Gates%2C%20Horatio%22.

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The Secrecy & Expedition of Your Excellencys movement from the North River, defeated my Wish to…
Your letter of the 7th of October was received at a time when I was wholly occupied in the seige…
Upon Your Excellencys return to Philadelphia, Colonel Tilghman acquainted Mr Clajon, that you had…
I have received your favor of the 20th of February, by which, I am surprised to find that my…
General Lincoln has in his letter of yesterday acquainted me that it is your Excellencys desire…
On receipt of your Letter of the 17th covering the resolution of Congress of the 15th and informg…

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REFUSING THE ASSIGNMENT

TO DESTROY

THE 6 NATIONS IROQUOIS

IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR


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To George Washington from Major General Horatio Gates, 16 March 1779

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From Major General Horatio Gates

Boston 16th March 1779:

Sir

Last Night I had the Honour to receive Your Excellencys Letter of the 6th Instant.

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The Man who undertakes the Indian Service, should enjoy Youth, & Strength; requisites I do not possess;

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it Therefore Grieves me Your Excellency should Offer me The only Command, to which I am intirely unequal; in Obedience to your Commands, I have forwarded Your Letter to General Sullivan, & that he may not be one moment detain’d, I have desired him to leave The Command with General Glover, until I arrive in providence, which will be in a few days1—Your may be Assured of my Inviolable Secrecy, & that Your other directions shall be fullfilled. I am Sir Your most Obedient Humble Servant

Horatio Gates

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Founders Online notes on above letter:

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ALSDLC:GWADfNHi: Gates Papers; copy, in James McHenry’s writing, enclosed in GW to John Jay, 14 April 1779, owned (2006) by Mr. Joseph Rubinfine, Cocoa, Fla.

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1. Gates is referring to GW’s letter of 6 March to John Sullivan instructing that general to take command of an expedition against the Six Nations along the Pennsylvania-New York frontier if Gates declined the offer to lead the expedition. For the letter from Gates to Sullivan, this date, that covered GW’s letter to Sullivan, see Hammond, Sullivan Papers, 2:534 (see also Gates to GW, 24 March). Gates arrived at Providence, R.I., on 3 April.

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Adam Stephen

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Last letter between the 2 is from Adam Stephen to George Washington

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7. For Stephen’s subsequent court-martial and dismissal from the army, see General Orders, 25 Oct. and 20 Nov. 1777.

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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/03-11-02-0478

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Notes

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Following info is from

http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/nr/pdf/jefferson/72001288.pdf

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Moratio Gates was born on July 27, 1727, probably a t Malden, England,

and entered the army a t an early age, as he was a lieutenant with

the troops under ~eneraiE dward Cornwallis i n Nova Scot ia i n 1749-50.

In 1754 he married the daughter of an army officer and the same

year he was commissioned captain in the independent company of foot

doing duty in New York. In 1755 his company joined General Braddock’s

expedition against Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh, Pa.). Gates was

present and badly wounded in the action of July 9, which destroyed

Braddockts army. On April 28, 1758, Gates was serving a t Fort

Herkimer in the Mohawk Valley of New York when Captain (the future

General] Nicholas Herkimer defended that f o r t against an attack by

the French and Indians. During the next two years Gates was on

duty a t Oneidia and Fort Hunter, also in the Mohawk Valley, then a t

Pittsburgh, Fort Ticonderoga, and f i n a l l y Philadelphia. He.served

as brigade major, or military secretary, to General John Stanwix

and then to General Robert Monckton. Late in 1761, Gates sailed ,

with Monckton in the very successful expedition against the Frenchheld

island of Martinique. Although he took l i t t l e part in the

fighting, Gates served with such distinction that Monckton commended

him to the attention of King George I11 as a “deserving officer.”

Selected f o r t h e honor of carrying the news of victory back to

England, Gates was rewarded by being commissioned a major in 1762.

When the war ended, he returned to England only to find that further

advancement in the army was practically impossible. He became

– e=b– 4- ~~~&-gm,~yt!M%~ -a-time~-h~- ,

1765 he was retired from active service and plac.ed on half-pay. A t

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about the same time he underwent a religious conversion and began leading

a guiet l i f e a t Bristol and then, a f t e r 1769, a t Devonshire. Gates

maintained a interest i n America and by 1770 He was known in England as.

a “red hot republican.” In August 1772 Gates and his family saided from

England for America; in 1773 he purchased a 659 acre farm plantation in

Berkeley County, Virginia (now Jefferson Comity, West Virginia) , which

he called uTravellerls Rest,” (Deed recorded March 15, 1773) and here

he b u i l t a house.

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By Eric H. Schnitzer, October 2009 (revised December 2013) Park Ranger / Historian, Saratoga National Historical Park

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http://www.62ndregiment.org/HM_General_Hospital_Burgoyne_1777.pdf

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