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Oct
01

William Crawford Burned at the Stake

By
When:
June 11, 2016 all-day
2016-06-11T00:00:00-04:00
2016-06-12T00:00:00-04:00
Cost:
Free

William Crawford Burned at the Stake

Still working on this page, researched 2015, 2016 by Jim Moyer , updated 1/1-2/17, 8/20/17, 8/30/17, 9/2/17, 9/3/17, 9/21/2017, 10/11/2017

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crawford-burn-at-stake-wm-crawford

Picture credit: see title on this album cover. Click on picture to enlarge,

See that guy in the middle? The one tied to the stake?

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The one with burn marks from a hot poker, most likely made by a broken Brown Bess musket barrel?

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Yes, that one.

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This happened in Ohio.  June 1782.

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And so did a recent decapitation of Crawford’s head, 25 August 2017.

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Maybe he should have stayed here in Winchester VA.

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Crawford at 27 years old, was surveying and working in the Winchester VA area when he first met 16 year old George Washington in 1749.

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It was difficult to find a photo of that statue before it was beheaded. No news article seemed to carry one. So we went to Google Maps and got in a Google Car. Here it is.  Navigate with your mouse or touch screen.

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Timeline of Highlights of Crawford with George Washington


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Old friend of George Washington’s. From the beginning. See all their  letters.

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William Crawford. Land finder for George Washington.

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Crawford was there with Washington at Fort Necessity 1754 (name misspelled? or not in returns) , and at Braddock’s Defeat 1755.

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Was here in Winchester in Washington’s VA Regiment at Fort Loudoun.

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Crawford made an Ensign.

Winchester, December 27th 1755

William Crawford1 received his Commission as Ensign in the Company of Scouts commanded by Captain Christopher Gist; who had money delivered him to Recruit with; the General Instructions, and the same private Instructions that were given the Officers at Alexandria the third instant (only the opportunities of Elections were omitted) and was ordered to Rendezvous here the fourteenth of February next.

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Founders Online Footnote:

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1William Crawford’s familiarity with the Shenandoah Valley region made him a particularly useful young officer in the Virginia Regiment during the next 3 years. See GW to David Bell, 25 April 1756, Robert Stewart to GW, 3 July 1756, and GW to Andrew Lewis, 21 April 1758. GW promoted Crawford to lieutenant 27 July 1757. After the war Crawford often acted as GW’s surveyor and land agent in Pennsylvania. Born in 1732, Crawford was killed at the age of 50 by Indians while on the Sandusky expedition in 1782.

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Source:

http://founders.archives.gov/?q=Date%3A1755-12-27&s=1111311111&r=2

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The first Hanging by George Washington

and it was here in Winchester VA

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Crawford was tasked to find William Smith,

deemed “one of the greatest villains upon the continent” 

then was sentenced to hang

at Fort Loudoun, Winchester VA, 29 July 1757.

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Proclamation of 1763

Forbids settling in western lands so as not to irritate another expensive Indian War.

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Washington intends to secretly flout this proclamation with his friend William Crawford.  GW believes the line drawn by the Proclamation of 1763 will fall one day.  And besides it did undo Dinwiddie’s 1754 promise of that same land.

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See GW’s letter to Crawford 17 September 1767:

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The other matter just now hinted at and which I proposd in my last is to join you in attempting to secure some of the most valuable Lands in the Kings part which I think may be accomplished after a while notwithst⟨an⟩ding the Proclamation that restrains it at present & prohibits the Settling of them at all for I can never look upon that Proclamation in any other light (but this I say between ourselves) than as a temporary expedien⟨t⟩ to quiet the Minds of the Indians & must fall of course in a few years esp⟨e⟩cially when those Indians are consenting to our Occupying the Lands. any Person therefore who neglects the present oppertunity of hunting ou⟨t⟩ good Lands & in some measure Marking & distinguishing them for their own (in order to keep others from settling them) . . . 

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I woud recommend it to you to keep this whole matter a profound Secret, or Trust it only with those in whom you can confide & who can assist you in bringing it to bear by their discoveries of Land and this advice proceeds from several very good Reasons, and in the first place because I might be censurd for the opinion I have given in respect to the Kings Proclamation & then if the Scheme I am now proposing to you was known it might give the alarm to others & by putting them upon a Plan of the same nature (before we coud lay a proper foundation for success ourselves) set the different Interests a clashing and very probably in the end overturn the whole all which may be avoided by a Silent management & the [Scheme] snugly carried on by you under the pretence of hunting other Game which you may I presume effectually do at the same time you are in pursuit of Land which when fully discovered advise me of it & if there appears but a bear possibility of succeeding any time hence I will have the Lands immediately Surveyed to keep others off & leave the rest to time & my own Assiduity to Accomplish.

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Because of Dinwiddie’s Promise of Land for the Men of 1754:

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See link – http://www.fayettetrust.org/upload/Col%20Crawford%20Statue.pdf

 

1765 Crawford settles  in what is now ConnellsvilleFayette County, Pennsylvania.  And there’s a statue there too.

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1768 Treaty of Fort Stanwix  Crawford surveyed lands for settlers and speculators. Lt Gov Robert Dinwiddie  promised bounty land particularly to only those in service in 1754.

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George Washington writes a letter in 1769 emphasizing the original and limited scope of that bounty land promise.

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Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crawford_(soldier)#Early_career

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Western Land by Ohio Scout Trip 1770

William Crawford and his brother Valentine helped secure land for George Washington near the Ohio River.

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Washington and Crawford and Dr Craik went out there in October to December 1770.

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As an interesting side note, the Boston Massacre occurred March 5, 1770, but the trial of the eight accused soldiers opened on November 27, 1770  with John Adams defense attorney for those British regulars.

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Dunmore’s War

4 years later Crawford is helping in Lord Dunmore’s War 1774, with Dunmore in Winchester VA raising troops.

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REV WAR

Crawford on 11 October 1776 is Colonel of the 7th Virginia Regiment. at  Battle of Long Island and the retreat across New Jersey  and at   battles of Trenton and Princeton and in the Philadelphia campaign, he commanded a scouting detachment for Washington’s army and by 1777 on the western front to fight the Indians allied with the British.

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Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crawford_(soldier)#American_Revolution

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Some More Timeline Context


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Yorktown wasn’t the end of the war.

The Yorktown siege ended 19 October 1781.
The Peace Treaty of Paris is 3 September 1783.
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So what went on for 2 years?
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William Crawford, lifelong friend of GW, and fellow soldier in the French and Indian and who surveyed land for GW in the Ohio Country was burned at the stake. That was national headline news and popularized with a song in 1782.
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The Indians were still fighting for personal reason and necessary reasons, with or without the encouragement of the British, who were hated by the Patriots for such spurring of horrors on the white frontier.
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This painting depicts the forces of British Major General Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis (1738-1805) (who was not himself present at the surrender), surrendering to French and American forces after the Siege of Yorktown (September 28 – October 19, 1781) during the American

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This link is about some events about that 1781 to 1783 period after Yorktown.  See this great site “AfterWARd”

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And this is a great site showing battles and skirmishes AFTER Yorktown 1781 and the Peace Treaty in 1783.  See this excellent listing of battles by year.

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Click on all pictures to enlarge.

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So as this page shows, Crawford is burned on the stake in June 1782
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http://frenchandindianwarfoundation.org/event/william-crawford-burned-at-the-stake/
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Pencil by Jim Moyer

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See Crawford in 1770 trip with George Washington to view the promised land by Lt Gov Dinwiddie’s 1754 proclamation of land for the soldier in the 1754 actions of the French and Indians.
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http://frenchandindianwarfoundation.org/event/washingtons-trip-out-west/
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Now back to that Stake. June 1782


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Picture Credit: James Boroff, Seneca County Museum in Tiffin, Ohio, USA.

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But that picture might not be there anymore. See link from 5/22/2011.

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crawford-at-stakeSee that White Man on a horse outside the fire perimeter?

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Simon Girty.

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The story:

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Captain Pipe, who knew Crawford

from the 1778 Fort Pitt treaty,

spoke to the crowd,

pointing out that Crawford had been captured

while leading many of the men

who had committed the Gnadenhütten murders.

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Crawford had nothing to do with the massacre,

but he had taken part in the “squaw campaign”

in which several of Pipe’s family members

had been killed.

Pipe apparently mentioned this as well.[92]

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After Pipe’s speech, Crawford was stripped naked and beaten.

His hands were tied behind his back,

and a rope was tied from his hands to a post in the ground.

A large fire was lit about six or seven yards (6 m) from the pole.

Indian men shot charges of gunpowder into Crawford’s body,

then cut off his ears.

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Crawford was poked with burning pieces of wood from the fire,

and hot coals were thrown at him,

which he was compelled to walk on.

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[Ed. Note: Simon Girty is the man depicted on the white horse in the above painting.]

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Eric Marchbein, 72, of Squirrel Hill, who initiated the drive for this historical marker years ago, said the Girtys lived at the bottom of the rigid colonial caste system even before their capture. Because they traded with Indians, they were held in lower esteem than indentured servants and known as “the Injun Girtys.” The great Seneca leader Guyasuta brought his protege, Simon Girty, to Fort Pitt in 1764 in keeping with the treaty requirement that all English captives be returned following the French and Indian War. By then, the young man had fully embraced Indian culture. In that light, it’s understandable that in 1778, during the American Revolution, Mr. Girty left his station as an American officer and fought alongside Indians on the frontier.

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Crawford begged Girty to shoot him,

but Girty was unwilling or afraid to intervene.

After about two hours of torture, Crawford fell down unconscious.

He was scalped, and a woman poured hot coals over his head,

which revived him.

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He began to walk about insensibly

as the torture continued.

After he finally died, his body was burned.[93]

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Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crawford_expedition

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Source on Simon Girty historical marker:

http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/brian-oneill/2017/10/08/Scapegoat-frontiersman-gets-his-due-at-last-simon-girty-historical-marker/stories/201710080080

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Of course you want to know the exact spot? 

Stay tuned. Will provide soon some links.

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And yes, there was a song about this.

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When was William Crawford born?
1722 or 1732?


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Allen Scholl’s genealogical study of the Crawfords, “The Brothers Crawford,” I found that, using a compilation of resources, he had pinned William Crawford’s birth down to August 2, 1722 in Westmoreland County, Virginia based on a compilation of records.
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For instance, if he was born in 1732, that meant that he was only 15 years old when he married Hannah Vance and 16 when his first child was born. Furthermore, it would have meant that his wife, Hannah, was eight years older.
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Statue of a 16 Year Old George Washington put into place at Washington’s Office Museum on Cork and Braddock Winchester VA. GW was 16 when he met William Crawford, 28, in Winchester area. This Painting is by Barry Vance. Exhibit at Museum of Shenandoah Valley Sept 2, 2017 through June 2018.

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See link about this Statue of young 16 year old George Washington.

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George Washington, History of the Life and Death, Virtues and Exploits of General George Washington, written by the former rector of the Mount Vernon Parish, Mason L. Weems. In this wildly inaccurate book that also created the famous cherry tree myth, Weems alludes to a teenage Washington participating in athletic games with the Crawford brothers during Washington’s first visit to the Shenandoah Valley in 1749. Therefore, Weems and a host of historians that followed merely assumed these two men were the same age and assigned a birthdate of 1732 to Crawford.

In fact, William Crawford was 10 years older than Washington. When they first met in 1750, young Washington was 18 years old and on his first surveying expedition to the Shenandoah Valley on behalf of Lord Fairfax.
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By this time, Crawford, who was 28 years old, had his own surveying business, which was why Washington hired him as a chainman on several surveys. He also had a farm, was married, and had three young children.

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I found it quite remarkable that one offhand passage in a biography of questionable accuracy influenced so many writers and historians.
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https://robertnthompson.com/2017/02/22/when-was-william-crawford-born/
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https://robertnthompson.com/2017/02/28/washington-and-crawford/
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Mt Vernon website supports birthdate 1722 and it adds Crawford over 6 feet tall?
do Company rolls support this?

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In 1749, while surveying land for Lord Fairfax, George Washington met a young man remarkably like himself. The person was William Crawford, a Virginian standing well over six feet tall who had been born in 1722 and raised by a widowed mother. The two men struck up a friendship that lasted for more than thirty years until Crawford’s death at the hands of Native American warriors deep in the Ohio Country during the last days of the American Revolution.
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Washington invited the young man to join him on his trip through northern Virginia and even taught the craft of surveying to his protégé. – Really ???? the above says Crawford already had a survey business.
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http://www.mountvernon.org/digital-encyclopedia/article/william-crawford/
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The brothers Crawford : Colonel William, 1722-1782 and Valentine Jr., 1724-1777 / Allen W. Scholl.
https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/005724790
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Disambiguation?


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crawford
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William Crawford (his last name was also spelled Craford or Crafford) (died by April 15, 1762) was an American soldier, politician, and founder of Portsmouth, Virginia.[1] He served as a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses for over thirty years.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crawford_(Virginia)
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But Crawford did destroy the Salt Lick Town in Columbus Ohio on the Scioto River
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William Crawford (2 September 1722 – 11 June 1782) was an American soldier and surveyor who worked as a western land agent for George Washington. Crawford fought in the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War. He was tortured and burned at the stake by American Indians in retaliation for the Gnadenhutten massacre, a notorious incident near the end of the American Revolution.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crawford_(soldier)
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Letters between

William Crawford

and George Washington


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The Washington-Crawford letters. Being the correspondence between George Washington and William Crawford, from 1767 to 1781, concerning western lands. With an appendix, containing later letters of Washington on the same subject; and letters from Valentine Crawford to Washington, written in 1774 and 1775, chronologically arranged and carefully annotated
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https://archive.org/details/washingtoncrawfo00washiala
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1757 – 1781
Founders online
William Crawford and George Washington
https://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Washington%2C%20George%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Crawford%2C%20William%22
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1773 to 1774
Valentine Crawford and Washington
https://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Crawford%2C%20Valentine%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Washington%2C%20George%22
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October 1770
Washington’s trip to the West
references to both Crawfords and their step brother Stephenson
https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/01-02-02-0005-0027
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Hearing of Crawford’s Death


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George Washington to William Irvine, August 6, 1782

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I lament the failure of the former Expedition—and am particularly affected with the disastrous fate of Colo. Crawford—no other than the extremest Tortures which could be inflicted by the Savages could, I think, have been expected, by those who were unhappy eno’ to fall into their Hands, especially under the present Exasperation of their Minds, for the Treatment given their Moravian friends. For this reason, no person should at this Time, suffer himself to fall alive into the Hands of the Indians.With great Regard & Esteem I am sir Your most Obedient & humble Servant
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https://founders.archives.gov/?q=Date%3A1782-08-06&s=1111311111&r=7
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Image of that actual letter
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage
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8 letters and one order that same day
https://founders.archives.gov/index.xqy?q=Date%3A1782-08-06&s=1111211111&r=1
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From George Washington to William Crawford, 20 July 1757
To William Crawford
[Fort Loudoun, 20 July 1757]
To Ensign Crawford
By George Washington Esquire; Colonel of the Virginia Regiment.
You are ordered forthwith to go in pursuit of Wm Smith, a Deserter from the aforesaid regiment, and to use your best endeavours to apprehend and bring him to justice at this place.1
If he shou’d resist, and stand upon his defence, contrary to the Laws of the country; you are in that case, to fire upon him as an Enemy. Given &c. this 20th July 1757.
G:W.
LB, DLC:GW.
1. In the list of deserters advertised by Dinwiddie (see GW to Dinwiddie, 11 July 1757, n.4) a William Smith is named. He is identified as a 20–year-old “sadler.” See the General Court-Martial, 25–26 July, at which a William Smith in Crawford’s custody was tried for desertion and sentenced to be hanged. He was executed on 29 July.
Index Entries
Permalink What’s this?
http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-04-02-0211
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All the letters between GW and William Crawford:
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http://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Washington%2C%20George%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Crawford%2C%20William%22
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WILLIAM SMITH THE SAME HANGED MAN

created 2/9/2016

Battle of Monongahela 1755 – Braddock’s Defeat

12 prisoners were stripped naked and dragged back to Fort Duquesne. A prisoner William Smith watched as the prisoners were tortured to death during the night at the river-side.
WILLIAM SMITH? IS THIS THE SAME ONE HANGED BY WASHINGTON?

. William Smith was one of the two convicted deserters hanged on 29 July. For his identity, see GW to William Crawford, 20 July 1757, n.1.

http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-04-02-0218#GEWN-02-04-02-0218-fn-0004
1. In the list of deserters advertised by Dinwiddie (see GW to Dinwiddie, 11 July 1757, n.4) a William Smith is named. He is identified as a 20–year-old “sadler.” See the General Court-Martial, 25–26 July, at which a William Smith in Crawford’s custody was tried for desertion and sentenced to be hanged. He was executed on 29 July.

http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-04-02-0211#GEWN-02-04-02-0211-fn-0001
4. The enclosure has not been found, but in a proclamation dated 19 July 1757 Dinwiddie listed the names and gave the descriptions of 108 drafted men from twenty-six counties who had deserted from the Virginia Regiment, offering a reward of £5 for every deserter returned to Winchester (Virginia Gazette [Williamsburg], 2 Sept. 1757).

http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-04-02-0193#GEWN-02-04-02-0193-fn-0004

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Find all the spots where William Crawford was?

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Click on top right corner square.

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A new window of this map will open.

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Click on Magnifying Glass on top left corner.

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Type in Crawford

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You will a list of locations. Click on any one of them to see that spot.

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THE BURN SITE

The Search for the Colonel William Crawford

Burn Site: An Investigative Report

Parker B. Brown

The Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, Vol. 68, No.1Qanuary 1985)

Copyright ©Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania

https://journals.psu.edu/wph/article/viewFile/3928/3745

 

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Links and Notes of Related Interest

Crawford at Fort Maidstone

Captains Stewart and Bell, Lt. John Campbell, ensigns John Deane and William Crawford, and 6 noncommissioned officers were at Maidstone with 101 soldiers. Captain Gist was in Winchester

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Source:

http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-03-02-0208-0001#GEWN-02-03-02-0208-0001-fn-0005

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GIRTY THE WHITE INDIAN

https://archive.org/stream/watsonsmagazines154wats#page/280/mode/1up

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William Crawford Burned at the Stake

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In 1782, a regiment of Virginia soldiers was sent in reprisal to destroy Indian villages on the Sandusky River, under the command of William Crawford, a friend of victorious General George Washington. However, the Crawford expedition ended on June 4 after a skirmish south of modern-day Carey, and the Americans retreated. Colonel Crawford was captured by the Indians after the battle, and seven days later he was tortured and burned at the stake on the banks of Tymochtee Creek in present-day northeastern Wyandot County

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Col._Crawford_Burn_Site_Monument

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Crawford’s death was widely publicized in the United States. A ballad about the expedition, titled “Crawford’s Defeat by the Indians“, became popular and was long remembered.[105][106] In 1783, John Knight’s eyewitness account of Crawford’s torture was published. The editor of Knight’s narrative, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, deleted all mention of Crawford’s trial and the fact that Crawford was executed in retaliation for the Gnadenhütten massacre. By suppressing the Indians’ motivation, Brackenridge was able, according to historian Parker Brown, to create “a piece of virulent anti-Indian, anti-British propaganda calculated to arouse public attention and patriotism.”[107] In an introduction, Brackenridge’s publisher made clear why the narrative was being published:

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But as they [the Indians] still continue their murders on our frontier, these Narratives may be serviceable to induce our government to take some effectual steps to chastise and suppress them; as from hence, they will see that the nature of an Indian is fierce and cruel, and that an extirpation of them would be useful to the world, and honorable to those who can effect it.[108]

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crawford_expedition

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Early career[edit]

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In 1722, Crawford was born in Orange County, Virginia, at a location which is now in Berkeley County, West Virginia.[1] He was a son of William Crawford and his wife Honora Grimes,[2] who were Scots-Irish farmers. After his father’s death in 1736, his mother married Richard Stephenson. Crawford had a younger brother, Valentine Crawford, plus five half-brothers and one half-sister from his mother’s second marriage.[3]

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In 1742 Crawford married one Ann Stewart and she bore him one child, a daughter also named Ann, born in 1743. Apparently she died in childbirth or soon after, and on 5 January 1744 he married Hannah Vance, said to have been born in Pennsylvania in 1723. She bore him a son named John (20 Apr 1744-22 Sep 1816; he married one Effie Grimes) and at least two daughters, Ophelia “Effie” (2 Sep 1747-1825, who married ?? McCormick), and Sarah (1752-10 Nov 1838, who married 1)Major William Harrison [c1740-13 June 1782], and 2) Lt. Col Uriah Springer [18 Nov 1754-21 Sep 1826]}. There may also have been another daughter, Nancy, born in 1767, who had apparently died when he wrote his will in 1782.[4]

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In 1749, Col. William Crawford became acquainted with George Washington, then a young surveyor somewhat younger than Crawford. He accompanied Washington on surveying trips and learned the trade. In 1755, Crawford served in the Braddock expedition with the rank of ensign. Like Washington, he survived the disastrous Battle of the Monongahela. During the French and Indian War, he served in Washington’s Virginia Regiment, guarding the Virginia frontier against Native American raiding parties. In 1758, Crawford was a member of General John Forbes’s army which captured Fort Duquesne, where Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania now stands. He continued to serve in the military, taking part in Pontiac’s War in 1763.

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In 1765 Crawford built a cabin on the Braddock Road along the Youghiogheny River in what is now Connellsville, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. His wife and three children joined him there the following year. Crawford supported himself as a farmer and fur trader. When the 1768 Treaty of Fort Stanwix with the Iroquois opened up additional land for settlement, Crawford worked again as a surveyor, locating lands for settlers and speculators. Governor Robert Dinwiddie had promised bounty land to the men of the Washington’s Virginia Regiment for their service in the French and Indian War. In 1770 Crawford and Washington travelled down the Ohio River to choose the land to be given to the regiment’s veterans. The area selected was near what is now Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Crawford also made a western scouting trip in 1773 with Lord Dunmore, Governor of Virginia. Washington could not accompany them because of the sudden death of his stepdaughter.[5]

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At the outbreak of Dunmore’s War in 1774, Crawford received a major’s commission from Lord Dunmore. He built Fort Fincastle at present Wheeling, West Virginia.[6] He also led an expedition which destroyed two Mingo villages (near present Steubenville, Ohio) in retaliation for Chief Logan‘s raids into Virginia.[7] During the expedition, Crawford’s men rescued two captives held by American Indians, killing six and capturing 14 Indians.[2]

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Crawford’s service to Virginia in Dunmore’s War was controversial in Pennsylvania, since the colonies were engaged in a bitter dispute over their borders near Fort Pitt. Crawford had been a justice of the peace in Pennsylvania since 1771, first for Bedford County, then for Westmoreland County when it was established in 1773. Arthur St. Clair, another Pennsylvania official, called for Crawford to be removed from his office, which was done in January 1775. Beginning in 1776, Crawford served as a surveyor and justice for Virginia’s short-lived Yohogania County.[8]

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Crawford_%28soldier%29

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From George Washington to William Crawford, 20 July 1757

To William Crawford

[Fort Loudoun, 20 July 1757]

To Ensign Crawford
By George Washington Esquire; Colonel of the Virginia Regiment.

You are ordered forthwith to go in pursuit of Wm Smith, a Deserter from the aforesaid regiment, and to use your best endeavours to apprehend and bring him to justice at this place.1

If he shou’d resist, and stand upon his defence, contrary to the Laws of the country; you are in that case, to fire upon him as an Enemy. Given &c. this 20th July 1757.

G:W.

 

LB, DLC:GW.

1. In the list of deserters advertised by Dinwiddie (see GW to Dinwiddie, 11 July 1757, n.4) a William Smith is named. He is identified as a 20–year-old “sadler.” See the General Court-Martial, 25–26 July, at which a William Smith in Crawford’s custody was tried for desertion and sentenced to be hanged. He was executed on 29 July.

Index Entries

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All the letters between GW and William Crawford:

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http://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Washington%2C%20George%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Crawford%2C%20William%22

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http://www.mountvernon.org/digital-encyclopedia/article/william-crawford/

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Statue of Crawford Beheaded

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Friday 25 August 2017

http://www.wtol.com/story/36227547/col-crawford-statue-at-crawford-county-courthouse-beheaded

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Colonel William Crawford, a lifelong friend of George Washington, was born in Virginia in 1722. He was married twice, first to Ann Stewart and later to Hannah Vance. In 1755, he served with Colonel Edward Braddock in the French and Indian war. In 1767, he moved to “Stewart’s Crossing,” Pennsylvania, near the Youghiogheny River. During the Revolutionary War he raised a company of men, commanded the 5th and 7th Regiments, fought in battles in Long Island, Trenton, and Princeton, and built forts along the western frontier. In 1782, he led the Sandusky Campaign into the Ohio country and was subsequently captured by Delaware Indians after the battle of “Battle Island.” On June 11, 1782, he was tortured and killed near the Tymochtee Creek near this marker. A monument dedicated to his memory is located about a quarter mile north of here. Counties in Ohio and Pennsylvania are named for Colonel Crawford.

The Sheriff’s office says there is no indication the vandalism is related to other reports of monument vandalism across the state.

If you have any information about the vandalism of the statue, call the Crawford County Sheriff’s Office at 419-562-7906.

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http://remarkableohio.org/picture.php?/9311/category/1554

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Statue of Revolutionary War Colonel beheaded in Crawford County

 

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http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/08/27/statue-of-slain-american-hero-george-washington-confidant-beheaded-in-ohio-courtyard

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Other Statues of William Crawford

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Fayette County PA

1917 Statue

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Col. Crawford Statue Rehabilitation Project Connellsville Carnegie Free Library 299 South Pittsburgh Street Connellsville, Pennsylvania 15425

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http://www.fayettetrust.org/upload/Col%20Crawford%20Statue.pdf

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PLAQUES

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http://explorepahistory.com/hmarker.php?markerId=1-A-21E

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Address: CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY
City: CONNELLSVILLE
State: 
Zip Code: 15425
Statue put up in 1917

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Within the pedistal of a statue of Colonel William Crawford located in front of the Carnegie Free Library of Connellsville, the following inscription is provide in a keystone-shaped plaque:

In memory of
COLONEL WILLIAM CRAWFORD
born in Berkeley County, Virginia, in 1732
Friend of Washington — Pioneer — Patriot
This monument is situated 1260 yards S. 69 E. 16′ of the
spot where he built his log cabin in 1765 on the west
bank of the Youghiogheny River, at the historic
STEWART’S CROSSINGS.
He first visited the region west of the mountains
in 1758, as an officer in the expedition of General
Forbes against Fort Duquesne. As a Colonel of the
Seventh Virginia Regiment, he crossed the
Delaware with Washington in 1777, and shared
in the victory at Trenton. Fighting in defense
of the frontier, as a commander of the
Sandusky Expedition, he was captured by
the Indians and burned at the stake
near Crawfordsville, Ohio, June, 11, 1782,

———-
Erected by
The Pennsylvania Historical Commission
The City of Connellsville
and Greatful Citizens
1917.

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http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMHP31_Colonel_William_Crawford_PLAQUE_Connellsville_PA

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http://www.nationalwarmemorialregistry.org/memorials/colonel-william-crawford-revolutionary-war-memorial-statue/

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http://www.memorialdayfoundation.org/pennsylvania/colonel-william-crawford-revolutionary-war-memorial-statue-plaque.html

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Burn Site Monument

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https://www.visitwyandotcounty.com/crawford-monument

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http://remarkableohio.org/picture.php?/9309/category/1554&slideshow=+period-5+play-false

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.https://www.visitwyandotcounty.com/crawford-monument

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This is a different Colonel William Crawford

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Portsmouth VA

2006 Statue

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Colonel Crawford Statue

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Col. Crawford’s memory immortalized with statue

  • The Virginian-Pilot

By Nicole Morgan

The Virginian-Pilot

PORTSMOUTH — It was a celebration fit to welcome a city’s founder.

Live music. Wine and cocktails. Linen-draped tables stocked with shrimp, bacon-wrapped scallops, crab cakes, strawberries and tiramisu.

Portsmouth’s founding father, Col. William Crawford, died centuries ago. On Monday, his memory was immortalized in a statue at the intersection of High and Crawford streets in Olde Towne.

A crowd including city officials, colonial re-enactors, and friends of the artist who sculpted the statue spilled down the steps outside of TowneBank and along the sidewalk.

They withstood hand-numbing cold. Mayor Jim Holley held a pair of scissors about as long as his arms, cut the red ribbon from the colonel’s waist and welcomed him home.

“This will always be here,” Holley said. “This is a signature in our community.”

TowneBank commissioned Portsmouth sculptor Sue Landerman , who also carved the athletes on the exterior walls of the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame and Museum .

Landerman said that despite her research with museums, re-enactors and historians, she found no sketches of Portsmouth’s founder. So she studied sketches of western Europeans from the 1700 s and decided to craft Crawford with “an English look” and a “Scottish chin.”

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She created her interpretation of Crawford from when he founded the city in 1754 .

The statue is 7 feet tall, and a granite base hoists it about 3 feet higher.

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Crawford wears a long coat and buckled shoes. While holding a plat of the city, he looks toward the shore.

Landerman said she hopes the expression on his face will leave people thinking he’s saying, “I’m very pleased with what I’ve done.”

Charlotte Wood , an Olde Towne resident and Landerman’s friend, said, “I just think it’s awesome the way it turned out.”

During the research and creation of the statue, Wood said, Crawford became more than a man in history books.

“Sue absolutely puts breath and life into any sculpture she does,” she said before taking another look at the colonel.

“If he wasn’t breathing before, he’s breathing now.”

Reach Nicole Morgan at (757) 446-2443 or nicole.morgan@pilotonline.com.

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https://pilotonline.com/news/col-crawford-s-memory-immortalized-with-statue/article_ef74c606-cba4-5115-9750-21b48df1c76c.html

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Losing the Actor portraying Col William Crawford founder of Portsmouth VA.

http://hamptonroads.com/2011/02/portsmouth-lose-founding-father-colonel-crawford

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This link is about some events about that 1781 to 1783 period after Yorktown.
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http://www.historyisfun.org/yorktown-victory-center/afterward/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=september

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And this is a great site showing battles, skirmishes of battles after Yorktown 1781 and the Peace Treaty in 1783.

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http://www.revolutionarywar101.com/battles/1782-battles/

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https://www.google.com/search?q=french+and+indian+war+drums+16+x+16&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:CTe86gbgJf4-IjjJ0YljdJm5e3g2Fxlr3nxviYlSbWRl3hxnj7Q1dukkZwNYBN1KrmAyKuGmeEiUQTSI4FiYMMcLJyoSCcnRiWN0mbl7EV48ruJfjB8yKhIJeDYXGWvefG8RqR8jjwhRls4qEgmJiVJtZGXeHBHa0eNw48cRmyoSCWePtDV26SRnEczA4Z2r3o8cKhIJA1gE3UquYDIRY5IKC3O4TuwqEgkq4aZ4SJRBNBFPmRuHNcrpHSoSCYjgWJgwxwsnEXwoYQctQkKz&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj4qJWus_3VAhXDtxQKHcLECYwQ9C8IHw&biw=1366&bih=589&dpr=1#imgrc=_

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