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Sep
14

Wolfe Street Winchester VA

By
When:
September 13, 2017 all-day
2017-09-13T00:00:00-04:00
2017-09-14T00:00:00-04:00
Where:
Wolfe St
Winchester, VA 22601
USA

Wolf Street Winchester VA

Compiled by Jim Moyer, 9/13/2017, updated 9/16/2017, 3/14-15/2018

Click on all pictures to enlarge.

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James Wolfe in July 1758 was a big hero when James Wood named a street in Winchester for him.  Wolfe was a hero in the “reduction” of Fortress Louisbourg.

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Next time you drive down Wolfe Street in Winchester VA, think of this picture below.

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In September 13, 1759 Wolfe became even more of a hero in the British win at Quebec.

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Like a Greek tragedy both Wolfe of the British side and Montcalm of the French side died in that battle.

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Then he became truly immortal  — made Christ-like in a 1770 painting by Benjamin West.

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1939 movie, It’s A Wonderful World,  (not to be confused with It’s A Wonderful Life made in 1945) Claudette Colbert says to a GLOOMY Jimmy Stewart, “You Sound like General Wolfe before the Heights of Quebec.”

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An American 1939 audience understood.

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WOLFE STREET, 1758 ADDITION

September 21, 1758

James Wood submits addition to Winchester, with WOLFE Street.

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Wolfe was famous from the Seige of Louisbourg ending July 26, 1758. but when he died in the Battle of Quebec in 1759 he became even more legendary and then immortal in 1770 due to Benjamin West’s paintng  —  at least until 1939 when Movie Audiences still knew who he was.

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Now?  He’s just a street you drive on.   At least here in Winchester VA.  🙂

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October 5, 1758

House of Burgess approves addition containing WOLFE Street among others

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1777 map made by a Hessian Prisoner captured the day after George Washington famously crossed the Delaware to attack Trenton on Christmas Day. This prisoner’s map indicates some of the streets in James Wood’s 1758 addition to Winchester still weren’t formed by 1777. Click on picture to enlarge. The overlay of the modern street and the captions and map work compiled and designed by Wilbur S Johnston.

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Source:

Pages 46-47, 81-82. Garland R. Quarles author. “Winchester, Virginia Streets, Churches, Schools” published by Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society, compiled in 1996 of Streets 1958, Churches 1960, and Schools 1964.

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This 1777 map still doesn’t show WOLFE Street has been built yet.

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Nor does it show Amherst or Boscawen built yet.

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James Wood submitted WOLFE Street and others for approval in 1758 to the House of Burgesses.

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To recap:

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James Wolfe was a hero way before he really became a hero.

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The Siege of Louisbourg.

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Amherst lands June 8, 1758 his assault. After a seige, the French surrender Louisbourg, July 26, 1758.

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And he wasn’t the only hero in that siege.

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Winchester VA must have really celebrated this victory,

because the 3 men in that seige

all got a name of a street in Winchester.

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These names will look familiar to a Winchester VA resident:

 

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Source: Pages 43. Garland R. Quarles author. “Winchester, Virginia Streets, Churches, Schools” published by Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society, compiled in 1996 of Streets 1958, Churches 1960, and Schools 1964. Click on image to enlarge.

On 23 January 1758, James Wolfe  <—

was appointed  Brigadier General,

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and sent with Major General Jeffrey Amherst   <—

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in the fleet of Admiral Boscawen  <—

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to lay siege to Fortress of Louisbourg

the mouth of the St Lawrence River

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For more on  the establishing of Winchester

and its additions

submitted to the House of Burgesses

by James Wood,

see this link:

http://frenchandindianwarfoundation.org/event/winchester-va-established/

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Painting in 1770 by Benjamin West of General Wolfe dying in the Battle of Quebec 1759.

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Wolfe may have been celebrated in Winchester in 1758 because of his action in the “reduction” of Louisbourg.

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But next year is when he really became a hero in 1759 losing his life at the Battle of Quebec.

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So too did the opposing French General Montcalm lose his life.

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A painting by Benjamin Rush of Wolfe dying at the Battle of Quebec,  really really immortalized James Wolfe.

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See Battle of Quebec ALSO known as  Battle of the Plains of Abraham

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A Movie refers to the Heights of Quebec

That this moment caught the imagination of most Americans is proven in a 1939 movie.

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Here is a 1939 movie, It’s A Wonderful World,  (not to be confused with It’s A Wonderful Life made in 1945) where Claudette Colbert says to a GLOOMY Jimmy Stewart, “You Sound like General Wolfe before the Heights of Quebec.”

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The 1939 movie audience knew what that meant.

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And those Heights of Quebec are depicted in this picture, where the top is known as the Plains of Abraham.

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From the Canadian Encyclopedia:

A View of the Taking of Quebec, 13 September 1759, published by Laurie and Whittle, 1759. The engraving shows the three stages of the battle: the British disembarking, scaling the cliff and the battle (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-1078).

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One more story of what was on Wolfe Street.

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What was on Wolfe Street?

See 17 on the map below.

“Fort George” – a stockade prison.

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Quarles lists what was nearby:

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Click on picture to enlarge.  Hit backspace to return back here.

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Robert Mallin's footsteps

Page 27 of Winchester Frederick County Historical Society Volume XII published 2000, article by Robert Mallin, titled, “Washington’s Footsteps”

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Fort George –

is located on Wolfe Street – a prisoner’s stockade on the hill back of present day Braddock Street Church

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Drill ground –

North of this corner of Braddock and Cork.

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Cocke’s Tavern  21 South Loudoun Street –

GW paid a year’s rent there on 2 December 1756.

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Military Hospital –

on Loudoun Street nearby

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Source is Page 11 from  Garland R. Quarles, author of “George Washington and Winchester VA 1748-1758, A Decade of Preparation for Responsibilities to Come,” 1974, published by Winchester Frederick County Historical Society.

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Source of the Map?

Robert Mallin

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Often the historians, especially the ones mentioned in this website have big stories of their own, and should not go unrecorded.

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Robert Mallin, recognizable for his top hat, conducted walking tours shown in map above. “He developed several walking tours for the downtown area and Mount Hebron Cemetery. He co-authored the book Ashby Camp Revisited. Although a native of Long Island, New York, he was a “Virginian by Choice.” “ Robert Mallin died December 7, 1999. – Page 134 of Winchester Frederick County Historical Society Volume XII published 2000.

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WOLFE’S LANDING

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Click on map and move to left (east) to see where Wolfe landed.

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That Wolfe landed there surprised the French who retreated, thus allowing more British troops to land.

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Get down to street level and walk around the fortress area with your mouse or touch screen.
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http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=13556

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Following text from above link:

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Wolfe’s Landing was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1929 because:
– here, on 8 June 1758, the men of Brigadier General James Wolfe’s brigade made their successful landing, leading to the capitulation of Louisbourg.

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The battle at the French Fortress of Louisbourg was one of the definitive battles between Britain and France for dominance in North America. Two years into the Seven Years’ War, the British executed plans to lay siege to the fortress, located on Cape Breton Island.
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On June 8th, 1758, Brigadier General James Wolfe, under heavy fire from French troops, successfully landed a party of light infantry on an undefended rocky beach in Kennington Cove, known to the French as Anse de la Cormorandière.
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The successful landing allowed Wolfe and his troops to launch a surprise attack against the French. Unaware of the size of Wolfe’s force and fearing the worst, the French troops quickly retreated towards the Fortress of Louisbourg.
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While the landing of the entire British force took weeks to complete, the initial landing of Wolfe and his troops, and subsequent evacuation of the French forces from the various defense works, created the opportunity for the British to lay siege to Louisbourg.
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The French fortress capitulated near the end of July 1758, effectively ending the period of French rule in Cape Breton.

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Above text is from this source:
http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=13556
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Wolfe
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The Winchester VA connection to Wolfe and Seige of Louisbourg
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http://frenchandindianwarfoundation.org/event/seige-of-louisbourg/
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http://frenchandindianwarfoundation.org/event/wolfe-street-winchester-va/
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Picture of Dr Warren Dying at Bunker Hill

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Warren County Virginia is named after this patriot, who was well known then.

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How is this

related to James Wolfe?

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Benjamin Rush supported Trumbull to make a painting of Dr Warren dying at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775.

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The Christ like gaze

copies Benjamin Rush’s

famous painting of

Wolfe dying at Quebec 1759.

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http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/the-death-of-general-warren-at-the-battle-of-bunkers-hill-17-june-1775-34260

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http://www.americanrevolution.org/bunksm.php

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http://www.ajronline.org/doi/pdf/10.2214/AJR.12.10352

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http://www.library.fordham.edu/trumbull/benjamin.html

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Trumbull’s Study of the Dying Warren

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