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James Wood the Son

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Currently under construction, compiled by Jim Moyer 2/1/2019, 2/8/2019

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James Wood the son

Timeline


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1741

January 28, 1741, James Wood, the son, was born in Winchester, Virginia, to the father of same name Col. James Wood and Mary Rutherford.   See source. 

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In 1735, his father of the same name James Wood,  organized land to prepared in 1744 for the founding of a town first called Opeckon, then Frederick Towne,  and finally in 1752 officially established as Winchester VA.

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November 20, 1741, James Wood the father, runs for House of Burgesses to represent Orange County .  See link.

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1752

April 20, 1752 The official name of Winchester is established in House of Burgesses.

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September 2 of this year loses 11 days.

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See events between 1752 and 1759 in Untold Stories. This was a busy time.  This time gives context to the formative years of James Wood the son.

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1759

November 6, 1759, The father James Wood dies.

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The son James Wood at age 18, takes over as Clerk of Court for Frederick Co VA.

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His public service began at a younger age as deputy clerk and deputy surveyor for Frederick County, while also serving as clerk of the vestry of Frederick Parish.

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1761

17th January 1761    Received of the Honble. 
Mr. Secretary NELSON, by the hand of James WOOD, 
the tickets according to the above list, amounting 
to Fourteen Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Five Pounds of Tobacco, to collect and account for 
according to Law.
Witness my hand, 		VAN SWEARINGEN.

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Taxes collected in the form of tobacco by Clerk of Frederick County, James Wood, the son who took on the office after his father of the same name, James Wood, died.   See link.

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See Frederick County Virginia Archives  – http://www.usgwarchives.net/va/frederick.htm

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And just about 1 year later on 2 January 1762,  14,240 lbs of tobacco were enumerated by James Wood.

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1766

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James Wood is elected to represent Frederick County in the House of Burgesses, serving until 1775.

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1774

Wood had a distinguished military career beginning as a captain during Dunmore’s War

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 Wood was also a member of the 1st (1774) and 5th (1776) Virginia Conventions.

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1775

Wood married Jean Moncure of Stafford County in 1775 and settled at Hawthorn, the home built on his family’s estate of Glen Burnie in Winchester.

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1776

colonel of the 8th Virginia Regiment Continental Line during the Revolution.

FIRST AS 12TH REGIMENT ?

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 Wood was also a member of the 1st (1774) and 5th (1776) Virginia Conventions.  With Adam Stephen.

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He served two terms in the House of Delegates in 1776 and 1784-1785.

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1779

In 1779, Wood became Post Commandant of the Albemarle Barracks in Charlottesville which accommodated the Convention Army Guard created to guard the prisoners taken from John Burgoyne’s army on 17 October 1777.

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1781

In 1781, he was named Commissioner of Prisoners for Virginia and Maryland.

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1784

He served two terms in the House of Delegates in 1776 and 1784-1785.

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???

During the interim, Wood was a member of the Council of State, serving as Lieutenant Governor, the head of that body, for several terms.

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1794

As Lieutenant Governor, Wood performed the duties as governor on a number of occasions, most notably during the long absence of Governor Henry Lee in 1794.

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1796

The pinnacle of Wood’s long public service came on 1 December 1796 when he was elected by the General Assembly to succeed Robert Brooke as governor of Virginia.

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James Wood’s served three one-year terms as governor between 1 December 1796 until 6 December 1799.

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James Wood’s governorship was distinguished by the construction of the Virginia Penitentiary and Manufactory of Arms.

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1813

Following his terms as governor, Wood returned to service on the Council of State until his death on 17 June 1813. Wood is buried at St. John’s Church in Richmond.

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See link on where buried in Richmond VA.

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NOTES


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JAMES WOOD

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Born in Winchester Frederick County, Virginia. on January 28, 1741, Wood was the son of an immigrant of the same name who performed surveys for Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron and helped found the town. He was educated privately and became active like his father in the local parish, Christ Episcopal Church in Winchester

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Wood_(governor)

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convention_Army

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http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaxtf/view?docId=lva/vi00867.xml

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James Wood, Jr., was born in Winchester, Virginia, on 28 January 1741, to Col. James Wood and Mary Rutherford.

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His public service began at a young age as deputy clerk and deputy surveyor for Frederick County, while also serving as clerk of the vestry of Frederick Parish. In 1766, Wood began his first term as a representative to Frederick County in the House of Burgesses, serving in that capacity until 1775.

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 Wood married Jean Moncure of Stafford County in 1775 and settled at Hawthorn, the home built on his family’s estate of Glen Burnie in Winchester.

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Wood had a distinguished military career beginning as a captain during Dunmore’s War and continuing as colonel of the 8th Virginia Regiment Continental Line during the Revolution.

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FIRST AS 12TH REGIMENT ?

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 In 1779, Wood became Post Commandant of the Albemarle Barracks in Charlottesville which accommodated the Convention Army Guard created to guard the prisoners taken from John Burgoyne’s army on 17 October 1777.

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In 1781, he was named Commissioner of Prisoners for Virginia and Maryland.

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 By the end of the war, Wood had obtained the rank of brigadier general of Virginia troops.

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 Wood was also a member of the 1st (1774) and 5th (1776) Virginia Conventions.

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He served two terms in the House of Delegates in 1776 and 1784-1785.

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During the interim, Wood was a member of the Council of State, serving as Lieutenant Governor, the head of that body, for several terms.

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As Lieutenant Governor, Wood performed the duties as governor on a number of occasions, most notably during the long absence of Governor Henry Lee in 1794.

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The pinnacle of Wood’s long public service came on 1 December 1796 when he was elected by the General Assembly to succeed Robert Brooke as governor of Virginia.

Wood was reelected for two additional one-year terms until 6 December 1799 and his governorship was distinguished by the construction of the Virginia Penitentiary and Manufactory of Arms.

Following his terms as governor, Wood returned to service on the Council of State until his death on 17 June 1813. Wood is buried at St. John’s Church in Richmond.

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http://ead.lib.virginia.edu/vivaxtf/view?docId=lva/vi00867.xml

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FOUNDERS ONLINE

 

 

GW and both JAMES WOOD FATHER AND SON

1758, 1773 – 1796

First two letters are the father and GW

The rest of the letters are with the son

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https://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Wood%2C%20James%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Washington%2C%20George%22

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JEFFERSON and JAMES WOOD

1780-1809

https://founders.archives.gov/search/Correspondent%3A%22Jefferson%2C%20Thomas%22%20Correspondent%3A%22Wood%2C%20James%22

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WEST FLORIDA

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2. Wood’s expedition to secure land in West Florida for himself and his friends came to naught. See GW to Wood, 20 Feb. 1774.

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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-09-02-0148

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https://archive.org/details/cihm_41222/page/n5

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James Wood reference page 355

With Charles Lewis of Augusta  — Andrew Lewis’ brother who died in the Battle of Point Pleasant?

https://archive.org/details/cihm_41222/page/n395

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1. Neither of Woods’s letters has been found. See GW to Wood, 1330 Mar. 1773. See also GW to Peter Chester, 25 Mar. 1773. For a somewhat suspect account of what may have been this trip down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers of Wood with Charles Lewis of Augusta County, see Smyth,Tour in the United States description begins J. F. D. Smyth. A Tour in the United States of America: containing An Account of the Present Situation of that Country; The Population, Agriculture, Commerce, Customs, and Manners of the Inhabitants; Anecdotes of several Members of the Congress, and General Officers in the American Army; and Many other very singular and interesting Occurrences . . .. 2 vols. London, 1784.description ends , 1:353–83.

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The Acct of Lord Hilsboroughs Sentiments of the Proclamation of 1763, I can view in no other light than as one, among many other proofs, of his Lordships malignant disposition towards us poor Americans; founded equally in Malice, absurdity, & error; as it would have puzzled this noble Peer, I am perswaded, to have assignd any plausible reason in support of this opinion.2

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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-09-02-0367

 

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